T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Study Quotes Collected and Collated

Quick Links:
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter One Linked Quotations
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two Linked Quotations
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Three Linked Quotations
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Four Linked Quotations

1. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter One – Samādhi Pādaḥ

“The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.
The first chapter, called Samādhi Pādaḥ,
assumes the aspirant has progressed adequately
to be in a state called Samāhita.
Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend
concepts such as Īśvara and Vairāgya.”
– T Krishnamacharya introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One

“The study of Yoga is a vast undertaking that
requires sustained effort and guidance.
The term Atha signifies auspicious beginning,
uninterrupted continuity, and an appropriate end.
Another aspect of Atha is Saṃkalpa,
which in Vedic tradition is the decision to initiate
something important and to ensure that it is completed
at any cost, without distraction or deviation.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“Yoga is a Saṃskāra, a process that prepares us to realize
the things we wish to achieve at various moments in life.
For instance, when children approach school age
parents must prepare them to make the adjustment from
being at home to being with other children and teachers.
This cannot be done suddenly, some orientation is necessary.
This is a Saṃskāra.
Yoga is a Saṃskāra in that it equips us
to realize our greatest potential.
If we wish, it can prepare us for and lead
us to the beatitude of the divine presence.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“Yoga is AnuŚāsana Śastra.
It is experiential, not speculative,
it is ancient, with its origin in the Veda.
Sages followed the Vedic teachings and
transmitted their experience to their students.
The students, in turn, learned and experienced the teachings
in their own lives, and thus became competent to teach.
In this way the lineage of Yoga teachers is established.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“One of the most notable sages in this lineage, Patañjali,
respecting Vedic tradition and blessed with proximity to the Lord,
presented this teaching in the form of the Yoga Sūtra, enabling
succeeding generations of Yoga teachers and students to
transmit their own experiences in a systematic and structured way.
It is because of this that every aspirant of Yoga pays
homage and respect to Ānanta, the spirit of Patañjali,
before proceeding with Yoga Saṃskāra.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“The Saṃskāra of Yoga prepares one
for Ātma Vidyā and is open to everyone.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“Yoga has no prerequisites except
that one must have a teacher and
have faith in Īśvara, the first teacher.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“What is Yoga?
Yoga is Nirodha of the different activities
and fluctuations of the mind,
the leader of the senses.
Nirodha is to completely cover.
Thus this Sūtra implies the Nirodha of
involvement of the mind in objects that
distract from a chosen direction of contemplation.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

Citta Vṛtti Nirodha, the state of mind
in which no distractions arise from undesirable
external stimuli and the individual is able to
choose an object of focus, ideally Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

”Another term for Citta Vṛtti Nirodha is Dhyāna,
the state of mind in which an individual focuses on,
visualises and remains with Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

“The ideal Dhyāna,
which becomes easier with practice,
requires certain preparations to reduce
the tendency of the mind to be distracted,
either by being jumpy and agitated, or dull and inert.
Chief among these preparations are proper diet and Prāṇāyāma.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

‎”Right Yoga is a vine of pleasant fragrance.
Wrong Yoga is a sharp pointed arrow – avoid it.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

“During such a moment, without distractions,
the power of the source of perception,
full of clarity and completeness, shines forth.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

“What is the nature of distraction?”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“Working together with and directed by past impressions,
the three Guṇa, Sattva, Rajas and Tamas determine
whether the mind is calm, agitated or dull.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“Past impressions also determine the
mind’s direction and quality of perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“Sages say that the fruits of this vine are three
wisdom, wealth and joy.
Those free of desire pick wisdom
Those full of desire pick money
Those full of devotion pick the fruit of joy.
These are what the world is seeking
whether rushing forth or keeping still
But once you know the essence
of this triple bearing vine
There is no need to choose among its flavours.
Bhīṣma said Yoga’s lord is Kṛṣṇa,
beloved of all the gods
Patañjali said hold back your mind to silence the din
Nāthamuni, too, said follow the Yoga path
away from sickness, ignorance and fear.
I remember the friend of Yogavalli – Nārāyaṇa
four armed friend with bow, sword, club, discus and conch.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“With discipline and modest fare.
Stay lean and keep the fire going in your belly.
Think of God and repeat his words – silently and out loud.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

“If you want to be happy take up Yoga.
If you don’t, don’t.
Follow your Dharma.
Stay where you belong.
Sing songs and thank the sun every day.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

“Look sharp, a vagrant mind will lead you astray.
Practice, pay attention and be amazed.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

Doubt burns up everything, including the doubter.
To banish it bow down to the Lord.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

“What is the true nature of the Citta?”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 6

“The mind acts in countless ways and all of them
stem from the power of past Karma Vāsanā.
This is why individuals differ from one another.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 6

“Even when our understanding is consistent with
our perception or repeated experience,
it does not necessarily indicate a fact.
For instance,
if we assume that a person is a woman simply
because that person is dressed in a woman’s clothes,
this is called Viparyaya or mental activity
that is based on something other than fact.
Viparyaya, then, is comprehension based on
a perceived characteristic in the observer,
which leads to false assumptions.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

“A particular Dharma is not there,
but somewhere we feel it is there.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

Nidrā or deep sleep is the state in which the
mind’s link with external stimuli is cut off.
In this state, Tamas is dominant.
Although in deep sleep the mind
has no link with anything external,
this does not exclude all links,
which is why we are often able to recall
whether our sleep was sound or disturbed.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 10

Anubhūta is the change that
occurs in one’s state of mind
when it is related to external objects
through the involvement of the senses.
This is also known as experience.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 11

“In this Sūtra Patañjali states that there are two ways
to discipline the five types of mental activity.
They are Abhyāsa and Vairāgya.
Abhyāsa is practice.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

“In order to discipline the mind,
we need to develop a mental practice
that clearly reveals the distinction
between the nature of Jīva and Prakṛti.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

Vairāgya is to disconnect or sever the link
between the Citta and external objects.
These two, Abhyāsa and Vairāgya,
always go together as a pair.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

Abhyāsa is the practice of reflecting on the difference
between the nature of Jīva and the nature of Prakṛti,
which brings momentary tranquillity to the mind and
eventually leads to complete and sustained mental tranquillity.”
– T Krishnamacharya on  Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

Abhyāsa, when performed with reverence,
without interruption, over a long period of time, will result
in a healthy body, acute senses and extraordinary alertness.
This kind of Abhyāsa is a solid foundation that nothing can disturb.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Detachment can imply
an attachment elsewhere.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 15

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka,
the state which there are no external distractions
to prevent clear perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya on  Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 17

“All mental distractions arise
from the free play of the senses
and only through continuing practice
can one keep their power in check.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 18

‎”Trying to escape from Saṃskāra
only increases their power and,
in addition, leads to the acquisition
of still more Saṃskāra.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 18

“What is Samādhi?
It is the ability to experience the
true nature of the objects of Meditation,
through a mind rid of the provocation
of excitability and inactivity.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

“There are two types of Yogis.
The first, Bubhukṣu, are Yogis who
seek material benefits through Samādhi.
This Sūtra speaks about the second type,
the Mumukṣu, who do not seek material benefits.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

“This Sūtra presents the quality of persons
who accept nothing less than complete
freedom from all sorts of bondage.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

“What is Samādhi?
It is the ability to experience the true nature of the objects of Meditation,
through a mind rid of the provocation of excitability and inactivity.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

“There is no question that Guru Paramparā
is essential for proper teaching,
understanding and practice of all Śāstra,
whether Yoga, Veda or Vedāṅga.
It is Paramparā alone that ensures that
words of the texts are interpreted correctly.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

“There are different grades
of inclination and possibility
among those who are interested
to experience the state of Samādhi.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 21

“Three types of Śiṣya:
1. The student doesn’t get started i.e. doesn’t get beyond Saṃkalpa
2. The student starts, but when there is an obstacle, stops
3. The student starts, but when there is an obstacle, takes it as a challenge”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 22

“In the second and third Sūtra the means to realise Samādhi
and the true nature of Jīva were explained.
The term used in those Sūtra is Draṣṭṛ
– that which perceives and aids in perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 23

“Through devotion and surrender to Īśvara
and by following the eight limbs of Aṣṭāṅga Yoga,
the benefits of Samādhi are realised with as little effort
as it takes to hold a pea in the palm of your hand.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 24

“It is through Praṇavo Japam that
the true nature of the Jīva is realised.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 29

“In this Sūtra,
Patañjali lists the nine kinds of obstacles
that are confronted by those who,
though fit and able to meditate on Īśvara,
neglect to do so.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

“Serious practitioners of Yoga from Vedic times to
the present day emphasise that a clear mind
is a prerequisite for Bhakti and
that it is only through Bhakti that
the true nature of the Jīva is revealed.
Bhakti, singe minded and abiding,
is the mark of a certain unique relationship
characterised by unshakeable faith,
absolute trust and boundless devotion.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

Food, eaten in moderation, at the right time
and in the right environment,
is of prime importance to achieving
and maintaining a healthy body.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

“The power of the breath,
the power of the senses and
physical strength of the body
are each distinct properties.
They should not work against each other
but rather contribute to each others well being.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

“Can these four Yoga AṅgaYama, Niyama, Āsana, Prāṇāyāma
– be practiced by everyone at every stage of life?
How often and how long should one practice?
How can we adapt our practice to changing circumstances?
These questions and others like them must
be answered by a competent teacher,
according to each student’s individual circumstances.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

Duḥkha is the mental activity
that brings impurities into the heart,
thus disturbing it.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

“When impurities disturb the heart,
one feels restricted and unable to move.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

Impurities in the heart cause mental agitation
– anxiety, lack of direction, anger.
This agitation, in turn, affects the body,
sometimes making it impossible
to sit still even for a few minutes.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

Bhāvana is a beneficial attitude
that is consciously cultivated,
despite tendencies to the contrary”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

“For curing an illness,
Prāṇāyāma practice of at least 24 breaths
should be done several times each day
– ideally eight times.
All other unnecessary physical activities should be curtailed.
Food should be limited to liquids – primarily milk;
and hot, dry foods avoided.
Breathing practice should be done
without the aid of any tools or instruments.”
–  T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“In VedaĀyurveda and Yoga Sūtra,
various techniques are offered to aid in healing the sick.
In addition to herbs and medicines,
Patañjali suggests that ĀsanaPrāṇāyāma and Vairāgya
are particularly beneficial and, as any medicine,
should be used with care and discipline.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“Among the disciplines to be applied are:
– Using appropriate breathing technique
when moving the body in Āsana practice.
– Eliminating unnecessary travel.
– Regulating the intake of food.
Without these disciplines, the practice of
Āsana, Prāṇāyāma and Vairāgya will not be effective.”
–  T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“It can be said that
sickness is Citta Vikṣepa
and health is Citta Nirodha.”
–  T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“In recommending Yoga practices,
teachers should always consider an
individual’s particular circumstances.
Just as other activities and practices must be adapted
to the changes in one’s life, such as ageing,
so too Yoga practices need to be
adapted as the practitioner changes.”
–  T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“Slow and regulated breathing using special techniques
to lengthen the the inhale and exhale processes
are also helpful techniques to quieten the disturbed mind
and reduce the unpleasant consequences of this state.
Along with these breathing techniques examination of food habits
and changing them to suit is also a must.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

Prāṇāyāma must be properly instructed.
The posture used, seated erect
for example, is also important.
The duration and regularity in terms of time
is also as important as proper instructions.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“Depending on whether the mind
is in a state of Samādhi or not,
the person enjoys permanent happiness or
successive chains of unhappiness and happiness.
Those who accept nothing short of Samādhi,
freedom from the suffering of disease is realised.
After all, the root cause of disease is the disturbed mind,
when we cannot distinguish right from wrong or good from bad.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

“According to my teacher,
trying to calm the agitations of the mind by reflecting on external objects
is like trying to get milk from the wattles hanging from the neck of a goat.
All seekers of truth are therefore advised to focus,
instead, only on objects that are in the realm of the divine.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 35

“In the case of a person whose mind
is calm and free from disturbances,
there is the integration of the person who meditates,
the mind which is utilised for meditation
and the object that is meditated upon.
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 41

“When disturbances that take the mind
everywhere but nowhere are contained,
then the individual is like a high class diamond,
with no blemishes.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 41

“Different suggestions are available in our tradition
to help the beginner arrive at the highest state of Samādhi.
For example, using the image or idol of Īśvara
in the form pleasant to the seeker or even a picture frame.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 42

“They will, at the proper time of day and in an appropriate place,
sit and watch the idol until they can completely
recall the image without having to look at it.
This ability will help the person overcome
the distractions from different sources
when they sit for contemplation on Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 42

“Another aspect of Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra
is that he looks at the world as real.
It is Sat. It is not Asat.
It is not a mirage.
Even the mirage is real.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 42

“The continuity of Dhyānam is compared
to a flame which is free from wind.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 43

“Until a person has reached a state of
Nirvicārā Samādhi life continues to be a mystery.
Whatever he may achieve or know of the world
or even of the cosmos, we are ignorant of our own self.
How little we can predict about ourselves, our future, our moods.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 47

“Each person possesses a body.
Encased in the body, as it were,
he goes through pain and pleasure.
The pain and pleasure through the body arises
because of contact with the external world.
However such variations of pain and pleasure
do not happen to one absorbed in Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 50

– Last Updated 25th September 2020

2. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two – Sādhana Pādaḥ

“The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.
The first chapter called Samādhi Pādaḥ
assumes the aspirant has progressed
adequately to be in a state called Samāhita.
Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend
concepts such as Īśvara, Vairāgya.”

“What about others who are known as Vyutthita Citta,
a mind easily prone to agitations and distractions?
This second chapter known as Sādhana Pādaḥ caters to them.”
– T Krishnamacharya introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“This Sūtra introduces
what Patañjali calls Kriyā Yoga.
Kriyā in the sense of action.
Take the first step.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

“The first step consists of Tapas.
The whole system functions on the strength of mind.
Mind is affected by what we eat.
‘Our mind is like our food‘.
Tapas is to discipline our eating habits.
Apart from right food, other activities like travel to holy places,
giving away gifts to the needy are also part of Tapas.
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

“The study that helps us to know where we are from
and what progress we have achieved.
In short, our journey to our roots is Svādhyāya.
There are many means. Vedic chant where the student
repeats exactly how the teacher recites the text is one.
The means should respect our culture.
It must help explore our own background,
our strengths and weaknesses and our progress.
Even a good teacher can be a mirror, a Svādhyāya.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Svādhyāya implies what the tradition teaches
or a teacher has taught as studies.
Thus, it does not necessarily mean that
they should read and recite Veda.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Svādhyāya is an inquiry into one’s true nature.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

“With faith in Īśvara,
the master of the whole universe,
regularly offering prayers.
Whether it is Tapas, Svādhyāya or Īśvara Praṇidhānā,
the power of Īśvara alone ensures success.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

“What are the effects of Kriyā Yoga?
Samādhi Bhāvana
The ability to pursue the right practice
that brings one closer to Īśvara.
Kleśa Tanū Karaṇa –
Reduction of those obstacles that we have
somehow acquired through wrong actions,
leading to undesirable and bitter experiences.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

Kriyā Yoga emphasises that the Kleśa
cannot be reduced instantly.
It is a gradual process.
Further Kleśa can only be reduced to
the limit they become ineffective.
They cannot be destroyed.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

“Only a teacher who has experienced
Duḥkha can heal others Duḥkha.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

“If Śarīra leads Ātma, there is Kleśa.
The cause of this is Karma Vāsana and Mithyā Indriya.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

“Only a teacher who has experienced Duḥkha can heal others Duḥkha.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

“These five Kleśa surround the heart of every individual.
They are related to the three Guṇa known as Sattva, Rajas and Tamas.
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3

As long as one chooses not to inquire into the
true nature of one’s self and acts mechanically,
they will unknowingly contribute to the dominance of the Kleśa.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3

“All these Kleśa are variable in their potency.
They can be so weak, that they hardly matter.
Sometime they take a feeble form,
when they can be easily contained.
If not they rise to dominance.
When in domination, only one takes over.
For example in the most evolved stage when Rāga is dominant,
other Kleśa such as Dveṣa are not apparent.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 4

“When something is understood differently from what it truly is,
it is called Avidyā.
What is changing is taken to be non-changing.
For example the mind.
What is subjected to decay is assumed to be pure.
For example the body.
What is leading to suffering is taken to be the source of pleasure.
What is not conscious is assumed to be conscious.
All these errors in perceptions have many possibilities.
But the ultimate stage of Avidyā is to
assume that we are the Masters, not Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Citta and Puruṣa are distinct.
They are in association like heat and water.
Water which is cold becomes
warm in association with heat.
Then we use the term hot water.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

“Similarly, because of the proximity of Citta and Puruṣa,
what is the quality of one is taken to be of the other.
In our convention they are often taken as one
and not two distinct entities with different natures.
This state is Asmitā.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

“The perception that something is desirable is Sukha.
This perception sets in motion an urge to possess it.
This is Rāga.
Whether what is desired will give
a lasting happiness is a different matter.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

“What is unpleasant is not desired.
The response of the mind is then to move away from it.
Whether in fact such a step did prevent Duḥkha is not immediately evident.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

Abhiniveśā is the extra-ordinairy
instinctive urge to survive at any cost.
No one is spared. In a way,
it is a dislike about one’s death.”
– T Krishnamacharya to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

“There are essentially three causes for fear….
desire, disease and death.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

Kleśa are not always dominant.
Through Kriyā Yoga they become weaker and weaker.
How is it possible to completely subdue them?
No mental effort can help as mind is the storehouse of the Kleśa.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 10

“When Kleśa are on  the move, time should not be lost.
Reflection is a must.
Reduction of all the factors that increase Rajas and Tamas,
including right food, company, study and Niyama is a must.
Without them,
reflection leading to a reduction of the power of Kleśa will not work.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 11

“What effects Kleśa have on us?
They affect our actions and the results are evident sooner or later.
Further they decide, in spite of us, what we do and don’t.
Our actions will be beyond our control, so are the consequences.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 12

“How we feel during the action is the quality of the action.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 13

Action with an unclear mind is a circuitous route.
Action with a clear mind is a straight route.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 13

“All actions are not rooted in Kleśa.
Those done when Kleśa are subdued produce joy.
Others produce different degrees of agony.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 14

“This Sūtra describes the origin of Duḥkha.
Duḥkha arises because of change, greed and conditioning.
Besides the Guṇa cause inherent changes unexpectedly.
This disturbs balance and Duḥkha follows.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 15

“Good habits can be as enslaving as bad ones
and can also lead to Duḥkha.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 15

“The way to better oneself is not to ponder
over the past but to look ahead.
Even Duḥkha is a great teacher.
In fact it is the first and important step
in the ladder of Viveka or clarity.
The greatness of Patañjali is to look at Duḥkha
as the stepping stone to success.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

“Different Yoga practices are meant
to prepare a person towards Dhyānam.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 21

“The association with the world full of form and change starts with the mind.
Suffering caused because of this association is an eye opener.
Who is suffering?
Who is recognising it?
What can release this suffering?
All these questions exist because of this association,
even though it may often be painful
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 23

Avidyā and Freedom do not exist together.
Here Avidyā represents both
the basis and attitude towards our action.
The aim of Yoga is to reach that state
where our actions are not based on Avidyā.”
– T Krishnamacharya to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 25

Mano Vikāra
Some actions I have done I have not got what I want.
Therefore this brings out certain changes
in certain mental processes and
a change in bodily activity.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

“Today this world is ‘standing’ on Vitarka
and it expands because of association.
It grows without any effort.
One has to put in special effort (Sādhana).
Otherwise nothing changes.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

Tapas
– Good, limited food
– The ability to listen
– Sharpening the senses
– Building resistance to Dvaṃdva
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 43

“The practice of Āsana without breathing and
without remembering Ananta has no value.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 47

– Last Updated 20th August 2020

3. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Three – Vibhūti Pādaḥ

“The practice which is
Śodhana for the Antar Aṅga
is Antaraṅga Sādhana.”
– T Krishnamacharya introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three

Dhyānam is the seventh Aṅga of the Aṣṭāṅga Yoga.
In order to experience Dhyānam, the sixth step,
Dhāraṇā, should have been practiced thoroughly.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 1

“Just as Mūla BandhaUḍḍīyāna Bandha,
Jālandhara Bandha and Jivha Bandha
are very important for Prāṇāyāma,
Mano Bandha is very important for Dhyānam.
Mano Bandha is Dhāraṇā.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 1

“The state of Dhyānam is possible in a seated posture.
If a person lies down, it may induce sleep.
If a person walks and moves about,
he may be distracted by the objects around him.
This posture must be in a place
where the mind will not be distracted.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 2

Dhyānam is an activity of a mind
dominated by Sattva linked to Ātma.
So Ātma and Sattva required for Dhyānam to occur.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 2

“A person who is physically fit and
who has been cleansed by the Agni of Dhyānam
has no fear of sickness, disease, age or death.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 2

“The evolution of Samādhi is
Sthūla Savitarkā to Sthūla Nirvitarkā.
This is Viniyoga Krama, then
Sūkṣma Savicārā to Sūkṣma Nirvicārā.”
– T Krishnamacharya on  Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 4

“Without Rajas Guṇa
there can be no Pariṇāma.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 16

Diet has a great effect on Maitrī Bhāvana.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 23

– Last Updated 25th September 2020

4. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Four – Kaivalya Pādaḥ

– Last Updated 20th August 2020