Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Study Quotes Collected and Collated

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Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Study Quotes Collected and Collated

“Within and around us is an absence of certainty and permanence.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā One

“The usual means to reduce suffering are
linked to impurity, decay and excess.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Two

“Primordial Nature is uncreated and yet creates.
Awareness is neither.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Three

“The means to right perception involves
direct observationinference and authentic authority.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Śloka Four

Direct observation involves selective ascertainment through the senses.
Inference is of three kinds:
– The past shaping the future
– Projecting the whole from the part
– Forming a comparison from a similar.
Authentic authority is trusted words and teachings.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Śloka Five

What about the supersensible?
“But, knowledge of what is beyond the range of the senses
is from inference based on generalised correlation;
and knowledge not attainable even by that is attained
though the eyes of another or authentic texts.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Six

We may not perceive what is within the range of the senses because we are:
“Disinterested or too far from.
Overly interested or too close to.
Blind or deaf to what is in front of us.
Distracted.
Not relating with what is there.
Seeing something between.
Letting something else dominate.
Confusing with something similar.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Seven

Non-perception (of Nature) is because of subtlety,
not because of non-existence,
since it (Nature) is perceived through its effects.
These effects are intelligence and the rest.
Some are similar to Nature and some dissimilar.
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Eight

Comment from Gaudapādācarya Bhāṣya:
Even in the world, a son is similar as well as dissimilar to his father.
The causes of similarity and dissimilarity we shall explain later.

“The Nature of the three Guṇa are Gratifying, Painful and Depressing,
(they serve) Brightness, Endeavour and Restraint,
and are mutually Supressing, Supporting, Producing, Co-existing, Mobile.”
– Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Twelve