Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

Patanjali Yoga Sutra

Quick Links:
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter One Collated Quotes
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two Collated Quotes
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Three Collated Quotes
Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Four Collated Quotes

I see this presentation as a Yoga Mālā or a thread of pearls on Yoga from Patañjali’s Sūtra eventually arranged over four chapters. I am endeavouring to stay close to my studies, but allow a little more freedom of expression in terms of choice of rendering to facilitate a more cohesive teachings thread for the reader.

For a fuller word by word Saṃskṛta study of the Yoga Sūtra readers are advised to follow the full online edition of the Yoga Sūtra wherein every word is translated and cross-linked along with a verse translation. This online Yoga Sūtra resource is also gradually integrating commentaries from T Krishnamacharya, TKV Desikachar and S Ramaswami from my own study notes, along with personal reflections.

It is offered in the spirit of Paramparā with an appreciation for
the many years of personal learning in India with TKV Desikachar.

It is not © in the spirit of open source community commons,
though acknowledgment of the source would be appropriate.

1. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter One – Samādhi Pādaḥ

“The Section on the assimilation
of what thinks it perceives,
with the source of perception.”
– Paul Harvey on  Yoga Sūtra Chapter One

Chapter One is about the Refinement of the practice of Dhyāna.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One

Annotated through Ten Themed Sections

1. Nirodha or Containment – verses 1-4
2. Citta or Psyche – verses 5-11
3. Abhyāsa & Vairāgya or Practice & Dispassion – verses 12-16
4. Saṃprajñāta or Total Knowing – verses 17-19
5. Śraddhā or Faith – verses 20-22
6. Īśvara or the Lord – verses 23-29
7. Vikṣepa or Distraction – verses 30-31
8. Eka Tattva or One Principle – verses 32-39
9. Sabīja or With Seed – verses 40-46
10. Nirbīja or Without Seed – verses 47-51

1. Nirodha or Containment – verses 1-4

Now,
you follow what follows,
the teachings of Yoga.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“Yoga arises from
the containment of,
our propensity to fluctuate.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

“To experience the spaciousness of Cit,
Yoga says practice enclosing the Citta.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2-3

“Yoga is the experience
of stillness within the
fluctuations of the mind,
rather than the experience
of stillness without the
fluctuations of the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 2-3

From this state,
a clarity of being,
as seeing is from the
source of perception.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

“Yoga is about seeking a relationship
with that which experiences,
rather than seeking experiences.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

“The less we act from within the field of the present moment,
the more we re-act from within the field of past memories.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 3-4

“Yoga is about refining the skill
to rest in the awareness of the Cit,
rather than nest in the nature of the Citta.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 3-4

At all other times we identify with
the fluctuations within the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“The mind modifies perception.
Though you might even say that,
the mind muddifies perception.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

“Every step towards observing the play of the mind,
is a step towards observing the ploy of the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

2. Citta or Psyche – verses 5-11

“These fluctuations fall into five groups
and can be helpful or unhelpful.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

Rāja Yoga is the relationship we have with our thoughts,
notably those that afflict, as in knock down or weaken, us.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 5

“The five groups are
right perception,
wrong perception,
imagination,
deep sleep and
remembrance.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 6

“We perceive through
our senses,
inference and
others testimony.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 7

Viparyaya is seeing what we want to see,
or not seeing what we need to see.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

Viparyaya is merely an opinion,
convincing in its rightness to exist.
A flight of fancy, posing, as if a truth.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

3. Abhyāsa & Vairāgya or Practice & Dispassion – verses 12-16

Abhyāsa or Practice is,
the effort to remain within
the stillness of the present.
Vairāgya or Dispassion is,
the absence of thirst towards
the dance of the past.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 12-15

“Yoga is about cultivating a profound discernment
of the difference between
the Nature of our Being and
the Being of our Nature.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 12-16

“Within the effort of trying to remain there not clinging to what arises
within the effort of trying to remain there not clinging to what arises
within the effort of trying to remain there not clinging to what arises
within the effort of trying to remain there not……..”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

Meditation is about the quality of the effort,
rather than the fruit of the time.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

“In Jñāna Dhyānam the most
difficult exercise for the mind
is the one of not exercising the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

Yukta Abhyāsa or skillful practice.
How to cultivate as intimate a
relationship with our Practice,
as with our Problems.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

“One of the aims in Yoga is to yoke to
the more discerning aspects of the psyche,
rather than to the more distracting aspects of the psyche.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

“Having a meditation practice is one thing,
practicing meditation is something else.
Better not to confuse the two in terms of
the gap between intention and outcome.
Meditation is that which might or might not
arise out of our efforts at meditation practice.
The outcome depends on the extent of the intention.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

“We never ‘give up…’,
we can only ‘stop…’,
because something
else pulls us more.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 15

“Yoga is about recognising change and
recognising that which recognises change.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 16

“We can experience an absence of
thirst for the ephemeral Guṇa
when the recognition of the
eternal Puruṣa pulls us more.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 16

4. Saṃprajñāta or Total Knowing – verses 17-19

5. Śraddhā or Faith – verses 20-22

“When you are linked through Śraddhā
you receive something from the source of that link.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

6. Īśvara or the Lord – verses 23-29

“The Yoga Sūtra is also very helpful in guiding us around
the notion of surrendering to that which we don’t know,
through that which we do know.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 23

“The Yoga Sūtra become as if metaphysical Mantra,
when they can be an internal intonation,
as well as an external edification.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 28

Bhakti Dhyānam uses Japa to build a bridge
over the fear bringing streams of the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 28

7. Vikṣepa or Distraction – verses 30-31

“The use of Āsana and Prāṇāyāma is
an investigation of all the 9 obstacles
in Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30.
Those things that come between how
we are and how we would like to be.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

“It is difficult to realise the wonders of Cit
within the wanderings of the Citta.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 30-31

8. Eka Tattva or One Principle – verses 32-39

Maitrī
Cultivating a feeling of friendliness
towards our own attempts,
let alone other’s demands,
to distract ourselves.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

Karuṇā
Cultivating a feeling of compassion
towards our bodies and minds,
whatever state we find them in.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

Muditā
Cultivating a feeling of looking,
from a joyful space in ourselves,
at what we can do well and now,
rather than what we can’t do well or now.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

Upekṣā
Cultivating a feeling of holding a distance from
the self-deprecation that can so often accompany
our attempts to improve the quality of our inner life
and old responses to inner tensions and memories.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

9. Sabīja or With Seed – verses 40-46

“If you remove the past from the present what is left?”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 43

“Yoga is about learning how to
get out of the way of the Way.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 43

“We need to be able to separate
our past from our present,
in order to move forward
within our meditational path.
The same applies as we move
forward within our life path.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 43

10. Nirbīja or Without Seed – verses 47-51

“To discern what can become knowing,
we may need to give up what can be believed.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 48

“The tendencies born from that experience
of knowing oppose other tendencies.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 50

“Yoga is about creating
new responses, especially
when experiencing familiar
arisings from old stories.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 50

Thus Patañjali’s view of Yoga in the Book on Integration

– Updated 9th April 2021

2. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two – Sādhana Pādaḥ

“The Section on the means
to help do something for
the practitioner starting
with an agitated psyche.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“More usually the past dominates the present.
Through Yoga Sādhana we work towards
the present dominating the past.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

Chapter Two is about the
Preparation for the practice of Dhyānam.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

Annotated through Ten Themed Sections

1. Kriyā or Activities – verse 1
2. Kleśa or Afflictions – verses 2-9
3. Dhyānam or Meditation – verses 10-11
4. Karma or Actions – verses 12-14
5. Duḥkha or Suffering – verses 15-16
6. Saṃyoga or Conjunction – verses 17-23
7. Avidyā or Illusion – verse 24
8. Kaivalya or Abstraction- verse 25
9. Viveka or Discernment – verses 26-27
10. Aṣṭāṅga or Eight Limbs – verses 28-55

1. Kriyā or Activities – verse 1

Activities that nurture a state of Yoga involve
self-Discipline, selfInquiry and SelfAwareness.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Tapas – the effort to reduce something.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Svādhyāya – to look at that which helps me understand.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Sva – To look at that
Adhyāya – Which helps me understand
– What is outside myself.
– What is inside myself.
– What is beyond myself.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Kriyā Yoga is about how to engage with our challenges,
especially whilst feeling disengaged by them.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

2. Kleśa or Afflictions – verses 2-9

Kriyā Yoga is more about
working with the symptoms.
Aṣṭāṅga Yoga is more about
working with their cause.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

“Taking care within the ‘small’ arisings
is directly related to our capacity to
take care within the ‘big’ arisings.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

Patañjali reminds us of the pitfalls of the illusion
of recognising psyche as awareness.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Avidyā is the illusion of recognising:
the ephemeral as the eternal,
the profane as the profound,
pain as pleasure and
the silhouette as the source.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“Until we see through the illusion of life,
we will be unable to see,
through the illusion of life.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“The Yoga Sūtra says you can’t change your life,
however you can change your perception of it.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“A necessary step in Yoga is to experience
a state of complete and utter disillusionment.
Arising from that is a state of Citta prepared
to give up its conviction of being the Cit.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“The search for understanding is driven by misunderstanding,
though not always in the right direction.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“One of the artful illusions presented by the Citta,
is its ability to as if dress in disguise,
so as to appear as if the Cit.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“What keeps you away from your self?”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Avidyā is the illusion of experiencing
what feels real, as if it is actually true.
However, that we experience a feeling as real,
does not in fact actually mean that it is true.
So how to discern as to whether a feeling
that we experience as real, is really true?”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“‘Who’ is it that misidentifies?”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“That’s our starting point…
This curious conjunction
of being Human and
yet human Being.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

“Within the sense of “I” Am-ness,
the I-ness is Prakṛti and
the Am-ness is Puruṣa.
The illusion is the sense of as if Oneness.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Rāga is more about passion
for the outcome rather than
passion for the action in itself.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

Duḥkha is the consequence
of Dveṣa from such as,
getting what you are not expecting or,
getting other than what you are expecting.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

“Yoga is about looking inwards,
at what we fear most.
Rather than looking outwards,
at what we desire most.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

Fear and Insecurity feed on the leftovers
from the meals of past experiences.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

“We can build
bridges of fear,
or we can build
bridges over fear.
The choice is ours.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

3. Dhyānam or Meditation – verses 10-11

“Building banks to channel
the flow of the river of
Kleśa is Kriyā Yoga.
Building a dam to block
the flow of Kleśa as
we journey upstream
going back to the source
of the flow is Aṣṭāṅga Yoga.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 10

4. Karma or Actions – verses 12-14

“Our actions reveal our intentions.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 14

5. Duḥkha or Suffering – verses 15-16

“There are some who are ruled by how they perceive the world as treating them.
There are others who reflect on how they are treating the world.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 15

“Better to be
creators of our future.
Rather than
curators of our past.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

6. Saṃyoga or Conjunction – verses 17-23

“We experience the world via the conjunction
of the ‘eye’ of the Cit with the ‘I’ of the Citta.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 17

“Through Avidyā we see two as if one.
Through Vidyā we know two is as if one.
Hence before there can be a state of Yoga,
there needs to be a process of Viyoga.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 17

“Yoga is not about not enjoying the world because we see it as it really is.
Rather it is seeing the world as it really is and still enjoying it.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 18

“What we observe is changing,
What we observe with is changing,
Where we observe from is unchanging.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 20

“An awareness of an
absence of awareness
is in itself an awakening
in awareness of awareness.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 20

“Yoga is about
remaining true to the Self
within the wiles of Myself.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 21

“Serve Yoga and Yoga will serve you.
That purpose of the seen is indeed for our essence.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 21

Ātma is the source of the sunlight in the Psyche.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 21

7. Avidyā or Illusion – verse 24

“Better to be clear about being confused,
rather than being confused about being clear.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 24

8. Kaivalya or Abstraction – verse 25

Hāna is the giving up
of the reliance on Asmitā
being perceived as if
the heart of one’s self.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 25

9. Viveka or Discernment – verses 26-27

“Some define their experience of life by seeking Duḥkha,
some by seeking Sukha.
The Yoga Practitioner sees both as Avidyā
and defines their experience of life by seeking
what lies beyond duality through unwavering Viveka.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 26

10. Aṣṭāṅga or Eight Limbs – verses 28-55

Satya is about how we use truth
rather than truth in and of itself.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 36

Asteya – non-stealing.
It’s not taking away that
which belongs to somebody else.
Whether Dravya, DharmaKarma, Vidyā.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 37

“This verse is commenting on the attainment of an Āsana as
an appurtenance, or foundation for more subtle practices.
Better not to confuse the vehicle with the direction.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46

“The experience known as Sthira Sukham Āsanam,
described in Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46,
arises as a fruit of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 47,
from melding the mastery of outer stillness in the world,
described as Prayatna Śaithilya, or relaxation of continued effort,
with the mystery of inner openness to the beyond,
described as Ananta Samāpatti, or unity in the infinite.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 47

“Some Prāṇāyāma Techniques prioritise Length.
Other Prāṇāyāma Techniques prioritise Subtlety.
While yet other Prāṇāyāma Techniques prioritise Both.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 50

Prāṇāyāma is a key to the door of Dhāraṇā.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 53

Pratyāhāra is a process that encourages us
to explore the means by which we can learn
to step out of the flow of the river of the senses.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 54

Pratyāhāra is the absence of a link
from the mind with the senses,
rather than the absence of a link
from the senses with the mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 54

Pratyāhāra is not feeding the tendency of the Citta to
automatically form a positive, negative, or neutral identification
with whatever stimuli the senses present to it.
From that we can begin to understand how
their external gathering activities stimulate our conscious
and especially, unconscious choices.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 54

“The Dasa Indriya or ten senses of experience and action,
whilst seen as belonging to the Bāhya Aṅga or five external limbs
in the eight limb Aṣṭa Aṅga Yoga of Patañjali,
are also the gateway to the Antar Aṅga or three internal limbs.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 54

Thus Patañjali’s view of Yoga in the Book on the Means

– Updated 16th June 2021

3. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Three – Vibhūti Pādaḥ

Chapter Three is about the Outcome of the practice of Dhyāna.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three

Annotated through Four Themed Sections

Dhāraṇā is the process of ‘holding onto’ the object.
Dhyānā is the process of ‘linking with’ the object.
Samādhi is the process of ‘integration into’ the object.”
Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verses 1-3

“To hold the Citta for connective moments is Dhāraṇā.
To be held by the Citta for connective moments is Dhyānam
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verses 1-2

“From Meditation
arises Integration.
The Splendour of Knowing
Connective Moments of
Containment within the Psyche.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 3

Dispersion is a habit
that pulls us away from
the habit of containment.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 9

“The paradox of being in a state of distraction
is that we are actually in a state of focus.
Its just that we are focused on being turned outwards,
as in the tendency of being scattered,
as in Vyutthāna Saṃskāra,
rather than being focused on being turned inwards,
as in the tendency of being contained,
as in Nirodha Saṃskāra.
Both Saṃskāra are acquired tendencies
and thus we can cultivate a choice within our oscillations.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 9

“From meditating on the Heart,
we come to know the habits of the Mind.
From coming to know the habits of the Mind,
we come to know the Intrinsic Nature of the Mind.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 34

“Intelligent Yoga practice invites you
into the field of the Heart within which
resides the mystery of its meaning.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 34

“The Yoga Sūtra is about reflecting on that which reflects,
in order to reflect from that which is the source of attention,
rather than from that which is the scene of inattention.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 49

Thus Patañjali’s view of Yoga in the Book on the Fruits

– Updated 10th June 2021

4. Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Four – Kaivalya Pādaḥ

Chapter Four is about the Goal of the practice of Dhyāna.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four

Annotated through Eleven Themed Sections

Vāsanā is an unconscious motivation directed towards
satisfying a physiological or psychological need.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 8

Saṃskāra always looks
to our past experiences
to determine our choices
for our future actions.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 9

“We look at the world through the eyes of
our needs and expectations.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 17

What you are looking at is coloured
by where you are looking from.
Where you are looking from is coloured
by what you are looking at.
So the mind may know or not know
where it is actually looking from,
or what it is actually looking at.
Or even not know that it doesn’t know
the nuances inherent in what and where.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 17

“The witness cannot be witnessed.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 18

“‘Who’ is it that identifies
that we misidentify?”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 18

“What is it we are prepared to give up,
in terms of that we know we know?
In order to be open to experiencing,
that which we don’t know we know.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 25

“Feelings from the past remain eternally potent ravagers,
especially pervasive within the illusion of our present and
with it a tendency to recreate an old shape from our past,
whilst we are believing it to be a new shape for our future.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 27

The safest place for the mind is in the past.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 27

Awareness is a quality not a quantity.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 34

Thus Patañjali’s view of Yoga in the Book on the Goal

– Updated 11th June 2021