Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Five Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Five Theory: Duḥkha and the Concept of Saṃskāra – Pages 69-79

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When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.

“When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

How can we distinguish the actual state of Dhyāna from infatuation……

d_paris_1999

Question by TKV:
“How can we distinguish the actual state of Dhyāna
from infatuation with an object that pleases and fills the mind?”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 24th 1988

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Four Practice

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Four Practice: Practice Planning – Pages 45-68

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When a person is free, it means that things outside of himself are not as disturbing

“There is a human state called Kaivalya. That is, a person is free.
When a person is free, it means that things outside of himself are not as disturbing as they were in the past.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 42

When we see the truth, when we reach a point that is higher than ourselves……

“When we see the truth, when we reach a point that is higher than ourselves,
there is a deep satisfaction.
It is not the emotional satisfaction that we get from looking at a beautiful object,
but a satisfaction deep within us that is without emotion or sentiment.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 32

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Three Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Three Theory: The Concepts of Avidyā and Duḥkha – Pages 31-44

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Very often people have this type of Duḥkha even when they are trying to improve their lives……

Duḥkha

“When we see something that we want and are able to get it, there is no Duḥkha.
If we are unable to to get it, this is the beginning of Duḥkha.
Very often people have this type of Duḥkha even when they are trying to improve their lives.
They become so thirsty for understanding that they are unable to get understanding as quickly as they desire.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 39

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Two Practice

g class=”aligncenter wp-image-2024″ style=”font-size: 1.5em; line-height: 1.5em;” src=”https://yogastudies.org/wp-content/uploads/Desikachar_teaching_gaunts_house.jpg” alt=”TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House” width=”290″ height=”200″ />

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Two Practice: The Principles of Practice – Pages 13-30

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Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter One Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House
‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter One Theory: The Meaning and Purpose of Yoga – Pages 1-12

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Clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House“In the Yoga Sūtra it is said that in the beginning of one’s Sādhana,
clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles, like a wave form”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter One Page 9

Religiousness in Yoga with TKV Desikachar – Still the best book on Yoga

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‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America, a transcript of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980. Currently available through Amazon US or Amazon UK, it still remains for me to this day in all but layout, one of the finest modern expositions on Yoga.

Also, for me, far superior to the later redacted version and re-published in 1995 under the title ‘The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’ by Inner Traditions, with many family photographs being added within a more ‘visual friendly’ presentation and a simplified less complex ‘reader format’. Personally described to me by Desikachar as ‘old wine in new bottles’.

Other causes (of disease), according to Krishnamacharya……

sraddha

“Other causes (of disease), according to Krishnamacharya.
You either have no faith in God or don’t control your Rāga.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Different people explain the cause of disease differently……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“Different people explain the cause of disease differently.
In the Yoga Sūtra disease is Vikṣepā, a mind which is unstable.
Mind loses its presence of mind before an object.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

As teachers we can only confine ourselves to diseases where……

cikitsa

“As teachers we can only confine ourselves to diseases where we have a role to play.
These are diseases where the mind is involved.
We work with diseases where a relationship exists between body and mind.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

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Once I am very clear about what is to be known – Svadharma

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“Once I am very clear about what is to be known – Svadharma,
then I can be clear about what is universal Dharma.”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

We should be careful if we feel very enthusiastic……

Desikachar_1999_1

“We should be careful if we feel very enthusiastic,
because it could distort the spirit of the teaching.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

What is the role of Dharma in the face of survival?

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“What is the role of Dharma in the face of survival?”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

How do you measure if something is important?

TKV_USA_3a1

“How do you measure if something is important?”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

If you don’t know your strength, then you can be easily influenced.

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“If you don’t know your strength,
then you can be easily influenced.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

What is the measure of my Śraddhā……

TKV_France_1999

“What is the measure of my Śraddhā. For example,
When a student says these practices are not working?”
–  TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

The less the depth of Saṃkalpa, the less the depth of what follows.

samkalpa

Saṃkalpa is a serious intention between and both from teacher and student.
The less the depth of Saṃkalpa, the less the depth of what follows.
Once this is there what is required is Saṃskāra.
Saṃskāra is to remove the obstacles.
In a way it is Viyoga, so that certain things that get in the way are put aside.
Saṃskāra is like cleaning a vessel before you cook.
Saṃyoga is where something begins to happen.
The accumulation of what begins to happen between teacher and student is Saṃyoga.
Proportionate to the quality of the three, the output will be different”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

The more they (the student) like you, the more they become attached.

raga

“The more they (the student) like you,
the more they become attached.”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

If you feel the strength, you’ll find the way.

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“If you feel the strength,
you’ll find the way.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

In meditation, one must make the transition from the gross……

dhyana

“In meditation, one must make the transition from the gross,
that which has form and which can be seen by the mind,
to the subtle, the formless.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988