Trying to escape from Saṃskāra only increases their power……

‎”Trying to escape from Saṃskāra only increases their power and,
in addition, leads to the acquisition of still more Saṃskāra.”
– T Krishnamacharya commenting on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 18

It is through Praṇavo Japam that……

“It is through Praṇavo Japam that
the true nature of the Jīva is realised.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 29

Before launching on Antar Aṅga Sādhana……

“Before launching on Antar Aṅga Sādhana,
one should be a Niṣṭhāvān in Bāhya Aṅga Sādhana.
If this earlier stage is very well established,
then only a teacher may teach Dhyāna.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1984

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka……

viveka

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka,
the state which there are no external distractions to prevent clear perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Abhyāsa, when performed with reverence, without interruption, over……

abhyasa

Abhyāsa, when performed with reverence,
without interruption, over a long period of time, will result
in a healthy body, acute senses and extraordinary alertness.
This kind of Abhyāsa is a solid foundation that nothing can disturb.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Abhyāsa is the practice of reflecting on the difference between the nature of Jīva and the nature of Prakṛti……

abhyasa

Abhyāsa is the practice of reflecting on the difference
between the nature of Jīva and the nature of Prakṛti,
which brings momentary tranquillity to the mind and
eventually leads to complete and sustained mental tranquillity.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

Patañjali states that there are two ways to discipline the five types of mental activity……

“In this Sūtra Patañjali states that there are two ways
to discipline the five types of mental activity.
They are Abhyāsa and Vairāgya.
Abhyāsa is practice.
Vairāgya is to disconnect or sever the link
between the Citta and external objects.
These two, Abhyāsa and Vairāgya,
always go together as a pair.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

In order to discipline the mind we need to develop a mental practice……

“In order to discipline the mind,
we need to develop a mental practice
that clearly reveals the distinction
between the nature of Jīva and Prakṛti.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

Because of the proximity of Citta and Puruṣa……

“Similarly, because of the proximity of Citta and Puruṣa,
what is the quality of one is taken to be of the other.
In our convention they are often taken as one
and not two distinct entities with different natures.
This state is Asmitā.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Citta and Puruṣa are distinct……

Citta and Puruṣa are distinct.
They are in association like heat and water.
Water which is cold becomes
warm in association with heat.
Then we use the term hot water.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

What is the true nature of the Citta?

“What is the true nature of the Citta?”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 6

When something is understood differently from what it truly is, it is called Avidyā……

“When something is understood differently from what it truly is, it is called Avidyā.
What is changing is taken to be non-changing. For example the mind.
What is subjected to decay is assumed to be pure. For example the body.
What is leading to suffering is taken to be the source of pleasure.
What is not conscious is assumed to be conscious.
All these errors in perceptions have many possibilities.
But the ultimate stage of Avidyā is to assume that we are the Masters, not Īśvara.”
T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

A particular Dharma is not there, but somewhere we feel it is there.

“A particular Dharma is not there,
but somewhere we feel it is there.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

It can be said that sickness is Citta Vikṣepa……

“It can be said that
sickness is Citta Vikṣepa
and health is Citta Nirodha.”
–  T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

Different Yoga practices are meant to prepare a person towards Dhyānam.

“Different Yoga practices are meant to prepare a person towards Dhyānam.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 21

Some disturbances will respond to Āsana……

“Some disturbances will respond to Āsana.
Some of the more resistant, to Prāṇāyāma.”
– T Krishnamacharya

One could say that I have taught Yoga to hundreds of people……

“One could say, of course,
that I have taught Yoga to hundreds of people,
of different ages, states, origins,
but by Yoga I mean only postures and breath control,
and do not count meditation or interpretation of the texts.

These I have only taught to a few people and
only to those I deemed worthy after several interviews,
designed to give me an idea of their personality
and the firmness of their intentions.

I discouraged those who appeared to have superficial reasons for learning Yoga,
but never those who came to find me because of health problems and
who had frequently been turned away by the medical profession.”

– From interviews with T Krishnamacharya by Sarah Dars,
published in Viniyoga Review no 24, December 1989

Three types of Śiṣya……

Three types of Śiṣya:
1. The student doesn’t get started i.e. doesn’t get beyond Saṃkalpa
2. The student starts, but when there is an obstacle, stops.
3. The student starts, but when there is an obstacle, takes it as a challenge
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 22

In the Sthiti Krama the most important Yoga Sādhana for the householder……

nadi_sodana

“In the Sthiti Krama the most important Yoga Sādhana
for the householder, according to me, is Prāṇāyāma.”
– From T Krishnamacharya’s composition,
the Yoga Rahasya Chapter Two verse 45

Tapas – Good, limited food……

Tapas
– Good, limited food
– The ability to listen
– Sharpening the senses
– Building resistance to Dvaṃdva
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 43

Today this world is ‘standing’ on Vitarka……

“Today this world is ‘standing’ on Vitarka
and it expands because of association.
It grows without any effort.
One has to put in special effort (Sādhana).
Otherwise nothing changes.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

Mano Vikāra – Some actions I have done I have not got what I want……

Mano Vikāra
Some actions I have done I have not got what I want.
Therefore this brings out certain changes
in certain mental processes and
a change in bodily activity.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

Only a teacher who has experienced Duḥkha can heal others Duḥkha.

“Only a teacher who has experienced Duḥkha can heal others Duḥkha.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

The way to better oneself is not to ponder over the past but…….

“The way to better oneself is not to ponder over the past but to look ahead.
Even Duḥkha is a great teacher.
In fact it is the first and important step in the ladder of Viveka or clarity.
The greatness of Patañjali is to look at Duḥkha as the stepping stone to success.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

If Śarīra leads Ātma, there is Kleśa…….

“If Śarīra leads Ātma, there is Kleśa.
The cause of this is Karma Vāsana and Mithyā Indriya.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2