Different people explain the cause of disease differently……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“Different people explain the cause of disease differently.
In the Yoga Sūtra disease is Vikṣepā, a mind which is unstable.
Mind loses its presence of mind before an object.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

As teachers we can only confine ourselves to diseases where……

cikitsa

“As teachers we can only confine ourselves to diseases where we have a role to play.
These are diseases where the mind is involved.
We work with diseases where a relationship exists between body and mind.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

read more

A Mantra is only a Mantra if it is special and secret……

mantra

“A Mantra is only a Mantra if it is special and secret,
and has been personally bestowed by someone
with whom you have a special relationship.
It must be pronounced properly”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

Through Yoga reverse Tamas……

sirsasanamaha_mudra_UB
“Through Yoga reverse Tamas – Śīrṣāsana, Uḍḍīyāna Bandha.
Both practices carry risks.
Breathing can be chosen for the less adept.”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.

viveka

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

Sthira Sukha should both be present in Āsana……

sthirasukha

Sthira Sukha (Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46) should both be present in Āsana.
It also implies one should be able to choose the breath ratio.”
– TKV Desikachar England 1980

Sāṃkhya and its aspects, what are the characteristics?

samkhya_small

Sāṃkhya and its aspects, what are the characteristics?
1. What is seen – The effect
2. What is not seen – The cause
3. What sees – Something other than cause and effect
The relationship between these three is discussed in Sāṃkhya philosophy.”
– TKV Desikachar India 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Yoga attributes everything to the mind.

samkhya_small

“Yoga attributes everything to the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar India 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

There is a relationship between Pariṇāma Tāpa and Saṃskāra.

parinama

“There is a relationship between Pariṇāma, Tāpa and Saṃskāra.
When you recognise this phenomena there is something that recognises it.
That something is not part of the phenomena.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony……

avidya

“A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony.
When there is no harmony there is the wrong combination of Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra.
This is known as Avidyā or not knowing a thing as it is.
The right combination is Vidyā.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Duḥkha and the absence of Duḥkha on the mental level is due to Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma……

duhkha_5

Duḥkha and the absence of Duḥkha on the mental level is due to Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma.
With no Saṃskāra the mind is dead.
With no Pariṇāma the mind is not alive.
With the two we try to strike a balance,
to have the two in harmony.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma……

samskara

“The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma in a  positive way.
If not the practice is wrong.
Therefore Yoga is a Saṃskāra which gradually changes from old Saṃskāra.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra……

parinama

“Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra you can have good or bad reactions.
Pariṇāma relates to perception, Saṃskāra relates to memory.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Without Saṃskāra there can be no evolution, memory, action……

samskara

“Without Saṃskāra there can be no evolution, memory, action.
There would only be Pariṇāma or constant change.
So Saṃskāra can be good or bad.
The mind is basically neutral.
It depends on what happens to us.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

When Saṃskāra takes one view and Pariṇāma another, there……

duhkha_5

“When Saṃskāra takes one view and Pariṇāma another there is friction.
Coming to Madras is Pariṇāma,
being unable to have those things you had before causes friction.
When you want those things you are used to through Saṃskāra,
then the Pariṇāma which caused this can bring Duḥkha.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next……

parinama

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next.
Suppose we are listening to music we like, a Saṃskāra or tendency,
and something happens to jar the appreciation.
The change is immediate and opposite to how we were.
Thus the Saṃskāra of listening to a particular style of music causes friction when there is change.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Ones own actions can develop or make one Guṇa prominent……

guna

“Ones own actions can develop or make one Guṇa prominent.
Thus we can plan or practice Āsana or Prāṇāyāma to promote one Guṇa.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible……

samskara

“The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible.
To develop tendencies or Saṃskāra.
The mind can also adapt and change or Pariṇāma.
Saṃskāra is the opposite of Pariṇāma.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

In Yoga is is said that everything that happens is from the mind……

citta

“In Yoga it is said that everything that happens is from the mind.
Citta is the mindstuff, the perceptual mechanism.
That which makes us see and remember.
Vṛtti is the activity, transformation, motion, modification, that is caused in Citta.
The mind is the main function for seeing,
without it the senses are useless.
The mind can develop words or ideas.
The mind can remember.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

In Sāṃkhya it is said that every problem comes from the Guṇa……

guna

“In Sāṃkhya it is said that every problem comes from the Guṇa and their interplay.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Everything we see has three qualities or natures.

guna

“Everything we see,
including the instrument of Mind (Citta),
has three qualities or natures.
In Saṃskṛta they are known as Guṇa.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Meditation can be related to the Guṇa…..

dhyana

“Meditation (Dhyāna) can be related to the Guṇa.
The object of our inquiry must be related or,
in accordance with what we want to produce.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The practice of Yoga can influence the Guṇa……

guna

“The practice of Yoga can influence the Guṇa.
i.e. The room where you practice can affect the Guṇa by photographs, colour of paint, smell.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

All matter has the three qualities or Guṇa

guna

“All matter has the three qualities (Guṇa).
The effects can be based on what we see, eat, hear,
and the effects of what we see, eat, hear.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important……

guna

“Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important.
There is the simile of the oil lamp in the Sāṃkhya Kārikā Śloka 13.
The cotton wick – Light Property (Sattva)
The basin or bowl – Heavy Property (Tamas)
The oil – Flows this way or that (Rajas)
The moment you dip the cotton in the oil it takes on that property.
Thus the Guṇa work together to produce the flame.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga