Learning Support for Chanting Āyātu Varadā

mantra

Learning Support for Chanting Āyātu Varadā
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 4 verse 41 – Āyātu Varadā
From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar recorded by one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta and Notations

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 8 – Meditation is about the quality of the effort rather than……

abhyasa

Meditation is about the quality of the effort,
rather than the fruit of the time.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

Until a person has reached a state of Nirvicārā Samādhi life……

samadhi

“Until a person has reached a state of Nirvicārā Samādhi life continues to be a mystery.
Whatever he may achieve or know of the world or even of the cosmos, we are ignorant of our own self.
How little we can predict about ourselves, our future, our moods.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 47

There are two types of Yogis…….

sraddha

“There are two types of Yogis.
The first, Bubhukṣu, are Yogis who
seek material benefits through Samādhi.
This Sūtra speaks about the second type,
the Mumukṣu, who do not seek material benefits.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

This Sūtra presents the quality of persons who accept nothing less…..

sraddha

“This Sūtra presents the quality of persons who accept nothing less than complete freedom from all sorts of bondage.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra looks at the world as real……

sat

“Another aspect of Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra
is that he looks at the world as real.
It is Sat. It is not Asat.
It is not a mirage.
Even the mirage is real.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 42

FAITH IN THE MODERN WORLD

A talk by TKV Desikachar in Nantes, France April 1995

In today’s world, the authority of tradition, religious institutions or elders is questioned and not accepted unless proven to the satisfaction of the individual.

However, when a person turns to someone or something with an attitude of respect and with the conviction that through this some­ thing good will happen, extraordinary results are achieved. This is especially so in moments of crisis.

TKV Desikachar, here presents an understanding of faith that the modern mind can accept and more important, that the modern mind needs.

This talk was given at Nantes, France in April 1995 when he visited Europe for a series of lectures and workshops there.

“I am very pleased that the subject of faith in the modern world has attracted so much interest. I would like to develop this idea in the following way. In the Indian tradition, even today, near the beginning of the 21st century, faith is very alive and is even taken for granted. In India, anywhere in India, people still believe in temples and teachers.

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There is a relationship between Pariṇāma Tāpa and Saṃskāra.

parinama

“There is a relationship between
Pariṇāma, Tāpa and Saṃskāra.
When you recognise this phenomena
there is something that recognises it.
That something is not part of the phenomena.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony……

avidya

“A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony.
When there is no harmony there is the wrong
combination of Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra.
This is known as Avidyā or not knowing a thing as it is.
The right combination is Vidyā.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma……

samskara

“The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence
Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma in a  positive way.
If not the practice is wrong.
Therefore Yoga is a Saṃskāra which
gradually changes from old Saṃskāra.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra……

parinama

“Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra
you can have good or bad reactions.
Pariṇāma relates to perception,
Saṃskāra relates to memory .”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

When Saṃskāra takes one view and Pariṇāma another, there……

duhkha_5

“When Saṃskāra takes one view and
Pariṇāma another there is friction.
Coming to Madras is Pariṇāma,
being unable to have those things you had before causes friction.
When you want those things you are used to through Saṃskāra,
then the Pariṇāma which caused this can bring Duḥkha.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next……

parinama

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next.
Suppose we are listening to music we like, a Saṃskāra or tendency,
and something happens to jar the appreciation.
The change is immediate and opposite to how we were.
Thus the Saṃskāra of listening to a particular style of music
causes friction when there is change.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible……

samskara

“The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible.
To develop tendencies or Saṃskāra.
The mind can also adapt and change or Pariṇāma.
Saṃskāra is the opposite of Pariṇāma.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important……

guna

“Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important.
There is the simile of the oil lamp in the Sāṃkhya Kārikā Śloka 13.
The cotton wick – Light Property (Sattva)
The basin or bowl – Heavy Property (Tamas)
The oil – Flows this way or that (Rajas)
The moment you dip the cotton in the oil it takes on that property.
Thus the Guṇa work together to produce the flame.”
TKV Desikachar on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Kleśa are not always dominant. Through Kriyā Yoga……

Kleśa are not always dominant.
Through Kriyā Yoga they become weaker and weaker.
How is it possible to completely subdue them?
No mental effort can help as Mind is the storehouse of the Kleśa.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 10

108 Sāṃkhya Study Pointers – 8 – Non-perception is because of subtlety…….

samkhya_small

Non-perception of Nature is because of subtlety,
not because of non-existence,
since Nature is perceived through its effects.
These effects are intelligence and the rest.
Some are similar to Nature and some dissimilar.”
– Paul Harvey on Sāṃkhya Kārikā Āryā Eight

Link to Series 108  Sāṃkhya Kārikā Study Pointers

Taking Yoga Further – Excerpt from Yoga for Every Body

Yoga for Every Body (220px)

Students often ask:
“How do I progress?
How do I know when I’ve progressed?
Does it mean staying longer in a posture?
Does it mean practising more often or for a longer time?
What are the next steps?”
and so on

These questions can be explored by looking at Yoga from three different viewpoints. They can help us appreciate what it means to change the unhelpful patterns of behaviour which cause us problems and difficulties time and time again.

The three viewpoints are:
1) Practice
2) Lifestyle
3) Attitude

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