We need to begin with a definition of Dhyāna……

dhyana

“We need to begin with a definition of Dhyāna.
Dhyāna involves an individual and a question or object.
On a simplest level, what happens between the individual and that question or object is the beginning of Dhyāna.
It can be any question, but it must be one question.
There must only be one channel between the “I” and the question, not multi-channels.
The “I” must temporarily drop the other interests and there must be a question.
There is no Dhyāna if there is no question or object.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

In the Vedic tradition, meditation – the need to reflect on something in……

dhyana

“In the Vedic tradition, meditation
– the need to reflect on something in order to understand it better
– is necessary for happiness.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Dhyāna means ‘to look for something new on a specific subject’.

dhyana

Dhyāna means ‘to look for something new on a specific subject’.
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Increasingly I observe Yoga teachers, even if not trained specifically in……

desikachar_ph
Increasingly I observe Yoga teachers, even if not trained specifically in this area, offering private tuition or 121’s as an adjunct to their other teaching activities.

I also observe a proliferation of Yoga trainings for becoming a teacher within 121 situations, especially Yoga Therapy, often as an adjunct or ‘bolt on’ to group teacher trainings, accepting students even if from other approaches, styles or traditions.

I have increasing questions around the personal developmental aspects of these options within the context of them being acquisitional skill based professional add-ons to ones teaching repertoire.

For example how does offering 121’s, as if a group class for one, or as I have observed, even advertising 121’s for up to two people; or offering short term therapy (i.e. palliative) based Yoga lessons, compare with the ancient models, such as the one I experienced over two decades of personal lessons with my teacher arising out of T Krishnamacharya and TKV Desikachar’s traditional transmission of ‘apprenticeship’ over a long period?

read more

Roots, Verb Forms and Primary Derivatives of the Saṃskṛta Language.

Roots, Verb Forms and Primary Derivatives of the Saṃskṛta Language
– W D Whitney – Saṃskṛta Professor Yale University 1895
From Archive.Org Online Resources

Let us examine the Yoga Sūtra……

samyama

“Let us examine the Yoga Sūtra……
In the 3rd chapter there is the idea of Saṃyama (C3 v4) or the Sādhana of regularly involving the attention of the person towards a specific object or idea.
There are certain Sūtra which tell us of certain powers or clarity developed through Saṃyama.
When a person has reached a certain level of attention he can pursue one examination within his individual capability for a certain period of time.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 2 – Patañjali reminds us of the pitfalls of the illusion……

avidya

Patañjali reminds us of the pitfalls of the illusion
of recognising psyche as awareness.
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

Yoga and modern medicine – Dr Uma Krishnaswamy talks to TKV Desikachar.

Yoga and modern medicine – A Dialogue:
Dr Uma Krishnaswamy talks to TKV Desikachar.
Special issue with the Sunday Magazine from the publishers of THE HINDU Well-being : March 12, 2000

Legend of Patañjali – Dhyānaṃ Ślokam for Yoga Sūtra

patanjali-1

It was learnt by heart as a Bhāvanam for Dhyānam,
to create a meditational mood linked to Patañjali prior to commencing,
either chanting practice or textual study of the Yoga Sūtra.
As taught to TKV Desikachar by T Krishnamacharya.
From Paul’s chant study recordings of TKV Desikachar
– Link to page with Downloadable Translation or with Chanting notations and sound file of Opening Prayers

The transmission shows the Siddhi of the Sādhana……

The transmission shows the Siddhi of the Sādhana

“The transmission shows the Siddhi of the Sādhana.
This is viniyoga.
These outlines are valid whether Śikṣaṇa or Rakṣaṇa Krama.
If what is given is mechanical it is not viniyoga.
That is why the viniyoga spirit is very important these days.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

Finally, Yukta Pracāram (skilful spreading), you ask the person to……

Yukta Pracāram

“Finally, Yukta Pracāram (skilful spreading),
you ask the person to transmit what they have received.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

Even practice can be mechanical even if it is regular……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“Even practice can be mechanical even if it is regular.
So Yukta Anubhāva (skilful becoming) is how much you have learnt from the practice.
What it has taught you.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

Yukta Abhyāsa (skilful practice) is how much a person practices……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

Yukta Abhyāsa is how much a person practices what he is given.
To see if he has learnt, understood and practiced.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

The teacher should find out how much the person remembers……

The teacher should find out how much the person remembers

“The teacher should find out how much the person remembers what they have understood or Yukta Smaraṇa (skilful remembering).”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

Grahaṇa Śikṣaṇa – Also able to absorb correctly what you have understood……

siksana

Grahaṇa Śikṣaṇa (grasping instruction) –
Also able to absorb correctly what you have understood.
You must test them, confuse them to see if they have.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

Even in the case of Śikṣaṇa Krama the ancient had cautions……

siksana

“Even in the case of Śikṣaṇa Krama the ancient had cautions.
The teaching must be appropriate to the intelligence of the individual or Yukta Śikṣaṇa.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

Some views say don’t teach children……

siksana

“Some views say don’t teach children.
However Śikṣaṇa Krama is only suitable for children.
Not adults who have become brittle.”
– TKV Desikachar France August 1983

In Mīmāṃsā there is a word called Prayoga (connection)……

mantra

“In Mīmāṃsā (a philosophical system to interpret the Veda, especially the Brāhmaṇa and Mantra, with the object of correctly performing the Veda rituals) there is a word called Prayoga (connection).
The same Mantra has to be recited differently for different rituals.
Or different Mantra in the same ritual.
So even here different applications are needed, the ancients recognised this.
There is a verse which says that if the Mantra is not used correctly it has the opposite effect and destroys or boomerangs.
Instead of doing good it will harm.
This is Mithyā Prayoga (wrong connection) with an opposite effect.
Having spoken of viniyoga (appropriate application), now looking at important points the old teachers used to convey these ideas.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

The role of ritual is the engaging of the psyche……

The role of ritual is the engaging of the psyche,
within the personal unconscious/subconscious,
by the conscious ego,
through the use of techniques such as gestures, symbols, visualisations and sound.
They are ‘chosen’ because of their potent links with archetypes,
in order to raise up archetypes,
especially the ‘Self’ archetype,
from the collective unconscious.
This process engages the power of an archetype from which the conscious ego pales by comparison.
From this arises the experience of a shifting centre of gravity from the ego to the ‘Self’
and the numinous becomes increasingly immanent.

read more

Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4 epitomise our Yoga Journey in……


Link to download this post as a PDF

read more