One example of this depth is Krishnamacharya’s lesser known work in the teaching of Mantra……

Even these days, the influence of Krishnamacharya’s teachings around Yoga are primarily known through his exacting teaching of Āsana. This has also been mainly experienced in the West with the developmental work of his early students, such as through the choreographical artistry in the work of Pattabhi Jois or through the geometrical precision in the work of BKS Iyengar.

However this area of Āsana teaching, though itself multifaceted and hugely influential, if disproportionately predominant within Yoga today, only reveals one aspect of the many dimensions of practice expressed within his teaching. This teaching evolved and refined over 70 years, from his return from his long stay around the borders of Nepal and Tibet in 1919, to his death in 1989.

A more all-inclusive insight into the many aspects of these other facets can be ascertained through exploring the multifarious approaches and priorities emphasised within the teaching work of other of Krishnamacharya’s students, such as TKV Desikachar, or S Ramaswami, or AG Mohan.

From exploring the teaching priorities of all these first generation students of Krishnamacharya, a more all-embracing perspective can arise encompassing both the breadth and depth of his mastery of both the teachings of Yoga and their context, place and application within the Indian perspectives on such as soteriology, philosophy and theology.

One example of this depth is Krishnamacharya’s lesser known work in the teaching of Mantra

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It is through Praṇavo Japam that……

“It is through Praṇavo Japam that
the true nature of the Jīva is realised.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 29

Before launching on Antar Aṅga Sādhana……

“Before launching on Antar Aṅga Sādhana,
one should be a Niṣṭhāvān in Bāhya Aṅga Sādhana.
If this earlier stage is very well established,
then only a teacher may teach Dhyāna.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1984

108 Yoga Study Path Pointers – 25 – Ere to our Yoga Sādhana turning inwards towards engaging……

Ere to our Yoga Sādhana turning inwards towards engaging
the Antar Aṅga and the ĀtmaBuddhi relationship,
we are advised to first turn outwards towards engaging
the Bahya Aṅga and the ManasIndriya relationship.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Study Path Pointers

The Multi-Topic Yoga Foundation Study Series – Module One Workshop July 13/14th 2019

The Multi-Topic Yoga Foundation Study Series Module One
– Āsana, Prāṇāyāma, Mantra and Sūtra

A two day Foundation Course on Āsana, Prāṇāyāma, Mantra and Sūtra is offered as a starting point for students wishing to explore Yoga Practice and Study but finding the range of options in the cYs Programme offering too many mono-topic themes. This Two Day Module draws together a number of the core practice and study strands that this approach specialises in into one composite multi-topic Course.

For more information on the background to the four topics that make up this Module read the Art of Yoga Foundation Study Series Modules One to Five Overview.

The Art of Yoga Foundation Study Series Module One is limited to a maximum of five students to allow for a personalised approach and in-depth transmission between teacher and student. It introduces the student, through a 2 day module, to the primary principles and teachings from T Krishnamacharya and TKV Desikachar on the art of application of Yoga.

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Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka……

viveka

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka,
the state which there are no external distractions to prevent clear perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Abhyāsa, when performed with reverence, without interruption, over……

abhyasa

Abhyāsa, when performed with reverence,
without interruption, over a long period of time, will result
in a healthy body, acute senses and extraordinary alertness.
This kind of Abhyāsa is a solid foundation that nothing can disturb.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Abhyāsa is the practice of reflecting on the difference between the nature of Jīva and the nature of Prakṛti……

abhyasa

Abhyāsa is the practice of reflecting on the difference
between the nature of Jīva and the nature of Prakṛti,
which brings momentary tranquillity to the mind and
eventually leads to complete and sustained mental tranquillity.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

Patañjali states that there are two ways to discipline the five types of mental activity……

“In this Sūtra Patañjali states that there are two ways
to discipline the five types of mental activity.
They are Abhyāsa and Vairāgya.
Abhyāsa is practice.
Vairāgya is to disconnect or sever the link
between the Citta and external objects.
These two, Abhyāsa and Vairāgya,
always go together as a pair.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

In order to discipline the mind we need to develop a mental practice……

“In order to discipline the mind,
we need to develop a mental practice
that clearly reveals the distinction
between the nature of Jīva and Prakṛti.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 12

Because of the proximity of Citta and Puruṣa……

“Similarly, because of the proximity of Citta and Puruṣa,
what is the quality of one is taken to be of the other.
In our convention they are often taken as one
and not two distinct entities with different natures.
This state is Asmitā.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Citta and Puruṣa are distinct……

Citta and Puruṣa are distinct.
They are in association like heat and water.
Water which is cold becomes
warm in association with heat.
Then we use the term hot water.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

What is the true nature of the Citta?

“What is the true nature of the Citta?”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 6

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 23 – Bhāvana for the Hips in Parśva Uttānāsana

Postural Practice Pointer 23 – Bhāvana for the Hips in Parśva Uttānāsana

When moving into Parśva Uttānāsana.
Lift the forward leg hip up and
draw the rear leg hip forward.
When coming up from Parśva Uttānāsana.
Keep the forward leg hip lifted and
the rear leg hip drawn forward.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 52 – Svā – To look at that which……

svadhyaya_2

Svā – To look at that
Adhyāya – Which helps me understand
– What is outside myself.
– What is inside myself.
– What is beyond myself.
– Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 51 – One of the artful illusions presented by the Citta……

One of the artful illusions presented by the Citta,
is its ability to as if dress in disguise,
so as to appear as if the Cit.
– Reflection around Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 50 – Yoga is about refining the skill to rest in the awareness……

Yoga is about refining the skill
to rest in the awareness of the Cit,
rather than nest in the nature of the Citta.
– Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 3-4

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 49 – The mind modifies perception……

The mind modifies perception.
Though you might even say that,
the mind muddifies perception.
– Reflection around Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 22 – The slower the breath the longer the movement…..

Postural Practice Pointer 22 – The Slower the Breath

The slower the breath,
the longer the movement.
The longer the movement,
the stronger the effect.
The stronger the breath,
the slower the movement.
The slower the movement,
the longer the effect.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Regarding Yama and Niyama, these days, he believes, they have no validity except for two of them

“Regarding Yama and Niyama, these days, he believes,
they have no validity except for two of them.

First, what is called Satya Niyama, or
what to speak, what not to speak, to whom to speak,
how to write, what not to write.
These are Satya Niyama.

Another Niyama that should be followed is Āhāra Niyama.
That is, how much to eat and what to eat,
according to age, profession, etc.
You see, the ancient people believed that
a young boy could eat as much as he liked.
But a Saṃnyāsi should only eat eight handfuls of rice,
no more, per day.”

TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’,
given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.