108 Postural Practice Pointers – 1 – Jaṭhara Parivṛtti and Movement

jathara_parivrtti

Postural Practice Pointer 1 – Jaṭhara Parivṛtti and Movement

When coming up focus on on the lower leg lifting up the upper leg,
rather than the upper leg hauling up the lower leg.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

The Ten Senses or Das Indriya are the gateway between…….

samkhya

The ten senses or Das Indriya are the gateway between the inner and the outer,
in the twin roads of this phenomena we call experience or action.

The five senses that transport experience from the outer to the inner
are called the Jñāna Indriya, or the senses through which we receive the world.

The five senses that transport actions from the the inner to the outer
are called the Karma Indriya, or the senses through which we put out into the world.

The co-ordinator of this remarkable interface is known as Manas.
The identifier in this remarkable process is known as Ahaṃkāra.
The discerner in this remarkable trinity is known as Buddhi.
The observer in this remarkable play of experience and action is known as Cit or Puruṣa.

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Yoga Postures in Practice – A series on Āsana by Paul Part 2 Tāḍāsana

Part Two – Growing from our Roots with Tāḍāsana

This is the second in a series of articles presenting the core principles for āsana practice as taught to me through many years of personal lessons in India with my teacher TKV Desikachar.

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108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 17 – Prāṇāyāma brings fitness of the mind for concentration.

As Prāṇāyāma dissolves the covering of the light,
fitness of the mind for concentration arises.
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 53

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 16 – From Prāṇāyāma the covering of the light dissolves.

From Prāṇāyāma the covering of the light dissolves.
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 52

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 15 – Negative reasoning such as harming and the rest……

Negative reasoning such as harming and the rest;
may be done, brought about, or by approval;
is preceded by greed, anger or delusion;
may be mild, moderate or intense;
its infinite fruits are suffering and ignorance;
thus cultivate the opposite side.
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 14 – When oppressed by negative reasoning cultivate the opposite side.

When oppressed by negative reasoning cultivate the opposite side.
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 33

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

Yoga is not an escape from life but an approach to living.

Yoga is not an escape from life but an approach to living.

‎”Yoga is not an escape from life but an approach to living.”
TKV Desikachar England 1976

T Krishnamacharya on Kriyā Yoga from the Yogavallī

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.

The first chapter called Samādhi Pādaḥ assumes the aspirant has progressed adequately to be in a state called Samāhita.

Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend concepts such as Īśvara, Vairāgya.

What about others who are known as Vyutthita Citta,
a mind easily prone to agitations and distractions?

This second chapter known as Sādhana Pādaḥ caters to them.

Chapter Two verse 1 – Kriyā Yoga

“The activites of Yoga are
self discipline, self-inquiry and contemplation on the divine.”

The first step consists of:

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Svādhyāya is an inquiry into one’s true nature.

svadhyaya_2

Svādhyāya is an inquiry into one’s true nature.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

The three Upāya to take control of our inability to see things clearly…….

patanjali-1

तपः स्वाध्यायेश्वरप्रणिधानानि क्रियायोगः ॥१॥
tapaḥ svādhyāya-īśvara-praṇidhānāni kriyā-yogaḥ |
“The activities of Yoga are self-discipline, self-study and contemplation on the divine.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

“The three Upāya to take control of our inability to see things clearly.

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It is not enough to clean a vessel, you must put something in.

kriyayoga

‎”It is not enough to clean a vessel,
you must put something in.”
– TKV Desikachar 1998 on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

We cannot say that this Āsana or this Prāṇāyāma can be given……

janu_sirsasana

“We cannot say that this Āsana or this Prāṇāyāma can be given for this disease.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1984

If a person can’t exhale from the lower abdomen then you can be sure……

baddha_konasana

‎”If a person can’t exhale from the lower abdomen
then you can be sure their Mūla is gone.”
– T Krishnamacharya

108 Study Path Pointers – 11 – Reflection on Saṃkalpa – The Art of Volition……

samkalpa

Yesterdays Smṛti can become Todays Saṃskāra,
without Tomorrows Saṃkalpa being re-affirmed,
through Todays Sādhana each and every day.
– Reflection on Saṃkalpa – The Art of Volition

Link to Series: 108 Study Path Pointers

What sustains Saṃkalpa day after day?

samkalpa

“What sustains Saṃkalpa day after day?”
– TKV Desikachar 1998

Reflections on TKV Desikachar’s Teaching and Svatantra……

As his pupil my teacher worked at guiding me towards becoming increasingly independent in developing and refining more and more my personal practice skills so I became less and less dependent on him being the vehicle for if, when, where, what and how well I practice.

I have always respected this aspect of his 121 teaching in that, like a parent with a child, he progressively facilitated my learning to enable me to grow into an intelligently consistent, situation adaptive and yet long term developmental self-practice, initially through, then much more than just Āsana.

Especially as, like any art that we wish to become accomplished in, this self-skill was cultivated primarily within my home environment with all its hues and moods that inevitably influence, or are driven by deeper motivations within our current intentions and situation realities.

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The target of Yoga is ‘svatantra’……

svatantra

“The target of Yoga is ‘Svatantra’ 
which means to discover our own technique.
Sva’ means self and ‘Tantra’ means technique.
The techniques are in oneself and we must discover them;
if not we will depend on others.
This is ‘Svatantra’.”
– TKV Desikachar

Saṃkalpa is mainly the intention to do something……

samkalpa

Saṃkalpa is mainly the intention to do something,
to be serious about my goal; it is something I feel I must do.
Saṃkalpa must be on both parts: student and teacher,
like when we chant ‘saha nāvavatu…’.
Saṃskāra means the purification,
like cleaning a vessel before I use it for another purpose.
It’s a kind of Viyoga or separation.
It concerns how I prepare for the situation.
The Saṃskāra is an effort in both directions: student and teacher.
Saṃyoga means there is a good exchange;
something begins to happen, something is given and something is received.
The best teaching has all three of these.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

The study of Yoga is a vast undertaking that requires sustained effort……

krishnamacharya4

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

अथ योगानुशासनम् ॥१॥
atha yogānuśāsanam
Now follow the teachings of Yoga.
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

“The study of Yoga is a vast undertaking that requires sustained effort and guidance. The term Atha signifies auspicious beginning, uninterrupted continuity, and an appropriate end.

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Yoga Postures in Practice – A series on Āsana by Paul Part 1 Samasthiti

Part One – Moving into our Bodies with Samasthiti.

This is the first in a series of articles presenting the core principles for āsana practice as taught to me over many years of personal lessons in India with my teacher TKV Desikachar.

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Kayena Vāca – Yoga Sūtra Chanting Closing Prayer with Translation

Yoga Sūtra Chanting Closing Prayer

This post follows on from yesterday’s post introducing the use of and intention within the practice of closing chants that follow the study of chanting, or the study of associated Yoga texts. Traditionally chant practice or textual study was also preceded with an invocatory passage to help forge a link between the chanters, what is about to be chanted and its purport, as well as setting a context for study.

Thus each area of study that the teacher and student were about to venture into was preceded by an appropriate Dhyānam Ślokam, or set of verses that specifically linked the chanters with that particular area of study or practice. Therefore the opening verses would differ according to whether the focus was Veda Chanting, the Upaniṣat, the Bhagavad Gītā, the Yoga Sūtra, etc.

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Kayena Vāca – Veda Chanting Short Closing Prayer with Translation

Veda Chanting Short Closing Prayer

In this lineage this particular dedication is a vital part of the closing process within a chant practice or textual study context and was important to and constantly used by Krishnamacharya throughout his life.

He also taught it to those of his direct students who studied chanting or the chant practices inherent in the study of associated Yoga texts with him within a traditional learning setting.

It is also called a Sāttvika Tyāga. This relates to the concept of not giving up the action, just changing your relationship with your expectations around the fruits of the action. This Bhāvana is inherent in the meaning of the chant and is linked to the teachings around the surrender of the self.

Further reflections on Krishnamacharya’s teachings on the concept of Sāttvika Tyāga within the Bhagavad Gītā will be offered within a future post.

kāyena vācā manasendriyairvā
budhyātmanā vā prakṛteḥ svabhāvāt |

karomi yadyatsakalaṃ parasmai
nārāyaṇāyeti samarpayāmi ||

sarvaṃ śrī kṛṣṇārpaṇamastu ||

” My body, speech, mind, senses,
intellect, essence, or outer and inner tendencies,

All that I will do over and over,
to the supreme Nārāyaṇa I offer.”

“All to the esteemed Kṛṣṇa I consign,
let it be so.”

View or download this Chant and Translation as a PDF.
View or download this post Chant and Translation with chanting notations as a PDF.

Begin your practice from where you are……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“Begin your practice from where you are,
finish your practice where you are going.”
TKV Desikachar Switzerland 1978

The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters……

The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters

“The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.
The first chapter called Samādhi Pādaḥ assumes the aspirant
has progressed adequately to be in a state called Samāhita.
Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend concepts such as Īśvara and Vairāgya.”
– T Krishnamacharya introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One