I find myself reflecting on the notion of ‘authentic lineage’……

I find myself reflecting on the notion of ‘authentic lineage’, often taught within the statement of Paramparā or ‘from one to another’ as in a succession from teacher to student et al. Both from questions asked of me and questions I have around what I see, generally within the world of ‘Modern’ Yoga and more specifically emerging around the claims on facets in the evolution of TKV Desikachar’s teaching over four decades.

Currently I see various representational phrases being used in modern organisational setups around pupils or students of TKV Desikachar such as ‘Influenced by the Teaching of…..’ or ‘The Living Tradition of…..’ or ‘The Lineage of……’ as if a provenance of authority alluding to authenticity, studentship and tradition.

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108 Teaching Path Pointers – 25 – The commercialised in-Corporation of Viniyoga……

The Commercialised in-Corporation of Viniyoga
is in danger of becoming a parody of
the Personalised incorporation of viniyoga.

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

It is very sad that the style has become more important than the individual.


“It is very sad that the style
has become more important
than the individual”.
TKV Desikachar

What are the concepts of Sṛṣṭi Krama, Sthiti Krama and Anta Krama?

 

What are the concepts of Sṛṣṭi Krama, Sthiti Krama and Antya Krama and what is their significance in relationship to the practice of Āsana, Prāṇāyāma and Dhyānam?

We can approach these three concepts and the question of their relationship with practice from a chronological and within that, a psychological viewpoint. According to the Yoga teachings from T Krishnamacharya there are three chronological and accompanying psychological stages of life, or Tri Krama.

1. The first Krama is the stage of growth and expansion known as Sṛṣṭi Krama. Here, chronologically, the starting point is the age from which people traditionally began the Āsana aspect of Yoga practice.

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Compare Dvipāda Pīṭham and Śalabhāsana in relation to their potential……

Compare Dvipāda Pīṭham and Śalabhāsana in relation to their potential within the following situations:

1. In strengthening the leg muscles.

2. Potential stress on the sacroiliac joint.

3. Influencing the circulation.

4. Potential risk on the knees.

5. As a preparation for Dhanurāsana.

6. In helping with flat feet.

7. In improving the inhalation.

8. In decreasing lower back pain.

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108 Postural Practice Pointers – 13 – The Lakṣana of Parśva Trikoṇāsana

Postural Practice Pointer 13 – The Lakṣana of Parśva Trikoṇāsana

The Lakṣana of Parśva Trikoṇāsana, or side triangle pose,
is as a movement OF the spine to the side over one leg,
rather than as a bending or arcing IN the spine towards the side.
Thus the aim is for the spine to stay straight relative to the leg,
with the intention of extending it from crown to coccyx.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

108 Teaching Path Pointers – 24 – A sign of a maturing in our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher is……

In the novice phase of our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher,
it’s not so much about what we bring to the Lesson,
it’s more about what we take away from the Lesson.

A sign of a maturing in our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher,
is that we accept more responsibility for what we bring to the Lesson,
being a determining factor in what we take away from the Lesson.

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

108 Teaching Path Pointers – 23 – In the novice phase of our relationship with a Yoga Class……..

In the novice phase of our relationship with a Yoga Class,
it’s not so much about what we bring to the Class,
it’s more about what we take away from the Class.

A sign of a maturing in our relationship with a Yoga Class,
is that we accept more responsibility for what we bring to the Class,
being a determining factor in what we take away from the Class.

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

108 Yoga Practice Pointers – 39 – Yoga is not so much about what we bring to the practice mat……

In the novice phase of our relationship with personal practice,
Yoga is not so much about what we bring to the practice mat,
it’s more about what we take away from the practice mat.

A sign of a maturing in our relationship with personal practice,
is that we accept more responsibility for what we bring to the practice mat
being a determining factor in what we take away from the practice mat.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Practice Pointers

108 Teaching Path Pointers – 22 – As a Yoga Teacher we need to ensure that our personal Yoga Practice…..

As a Yoga Teacher we need to ensure that our personal Yoga Practice
doesn’t become a repetition of, or rehearsal for, our Yoga Teaching plans.

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

108 Teaching Path Pointers – 21 – Our Yoga Teaching needs to be an appurtenance to our Yoga Practice.

Our Yoga Teaching needs to be an appurtenance to our Yoga Practice.
Rather than our Yoga Practice being an appurtenance to our Yoga Teaching.

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

We should never forget what Patañjali has said……

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Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 6 – “tasya bhūmiṣu viniyogaḥ”.
“We should never forget what Patañjali has said –
Teach according to the strength, resources and weakness of the individual”.
TKV Desikachar

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 5 – Bhāvana for the Breath in Kumbhaka

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Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointer 5 – Bhāvana for the Breath in Kumbhaka

Explore the Antar Kumbhaka with a soft holding.
Explore the Bāhya Kumbhaka with a firm surrender.

Link to Posts Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

108 Yoga Practice Pointers – 38 – Our Yoga practice needs to evolve….

Our Yoga practice needs to evolve,
amongst other longer term unfoldings,
towards a live-in personalised relationship,
rather than just a go-out group class affair.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Practice Pointers

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 12 – The Viniyoga of Daṇḍāsana

Postural Practice Pointer 12 – The Viniyoga of Daṇḍāsana

“The starting point determines the journey.”

  • Legs are together unless some anatomical reason why this is not possible
  • The sides of the feet are maintained together, stretch the back of the heels
  • A key point here is having active hips, releasing the knees can activate the hips
  • Someone who is stiff in spine and legs will certainly need to release the knees
  • Release the knees as much as is required to extend the spine towards vertical
  • Someone who is flexible may also need to release the knees so as to activate hips
  • The mortar (hips/pelvis) must be strong for the pestle (spine) to work strongly
  • Shoulder blades are back, feel the channel between the shoulder blades
  • Back of the neck drawn up to help lift chest up
  • Hands or fingers on the ground back by hips but not weight bearing

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

There is a place for God in Every Being…..

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Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“The Sūtra does not require the Gem.
But the Gem requires the Sūtra.
Just like there is a hole in every Gem,
there is a place for God in Every Being
and that hole is the Heart.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Seven verse 7

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Sound Health Half Day Workshop – Israel January 9th 2018

ISRAELI YOGA TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION

Tuesday January 9th 2018

Sound Health Workshop on

A Half Day of Yoga Chanting with Paul Harvey,
student of TKV Desikachar

A half day open to all Yoga students and teachers interested in Sound and Chanting,
irrespective of experience and ability.

We will explore Yoga Chanting focussed on the application of Sound
within Practice, with discussion and question time.

The emphasis will be the application of Yoga chanting in practice and
the role of sound as a tool for health, well being and awareness.

Follow Link to Read or Download a PDF of the Course

You do your group of Āsana linked like words in a sentence………


“Another important thing that he has understood is
that these Āsana should not be taken one by one,
they have to be taken as a group and as a composition.
This means you don’t do headstand on Monday,
shoulder stand on Tuesday,
you do your group of Āsana linked like words in a sentence.”
– TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’,
given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.

Breathing techniques should support the Āsana whichever way……

“Breathing techniques should support the Āsana whichever way it needs to be supported.
Sometimes you can de-emphasise the movement by the use of the breath.
This can be in a positive or a negative role.
In a negative role the breath is being abused and not supporting by overpowering the Āsana.
In a positive role the breath can shift the emphasis or attention away from the body.
This would be useful in the case of bodily tension or a particularly sensitive or painful area.”
– From personal lessons with TKV Desikachar

Āsana practice as a prerequisite to exploring how to integrate Prāṇāyāma……


I was taught by Desikachar that we need to at least have some sort of working relationship with an Āsana practice as a prerequisite to exploring how to integrate Prāṇāyāma into our practice Sādhana.

Also in the approach of Krishnamacharya and Desikachar to Yoga practice this idea is even more relevant as important information, that guides our initial and subsequent steps into Prāṇāyāma, is gleaned from certain factors only apparent from observation of how our respiratory system performs during Āsana practice.

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