108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers – 46 – The First and Second Chapters of the Yoga Sūtra can be linked…

The First and Second Chapters of the Yoga Sūtra
can be linked to the teaching concepts of
Śikṣaṇa, Rakṣaṇa and Cikitsā Krama.

In that the Samādhi Yoga in Chapter One
can be seen as apt for a Śikṣaṇa situation,
whereby the primary aim is discernment, as in
exploring what lies within the sense of I-Am.

Whereas, in Chapter Two, the Kriya Yoga section
can be seen as being apt for a Cikitsā situation,
whereby the primary aim is recovering, as in
reducing agitation through lifestyle changes.

Whereas, in the Bāhya Aṅga section of Aṣṭāṅga Yoga
can be seen as being apt for a Rakṣaṇa situation,
whereby the primary aim is establishing stability,
through a formal practice within a Yoga Sādhana.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 40 – Bhāvana on Śavāsana within an…

Bhāvana on Śavāsana within a Śikṣaṇa Āsana practice.

Inherent within the application of Śavāsana
as an Āsana within a Śikṣaṇa Krama practice,
is the active cultivation of a quality of Nirodha,
or what can be described as ‘witness awareness’.
As in the notion of the Cit observing the Citta.
Thus, a key to directing the attention in
Śavāsana, is to intentionally cultivate
a quality of passive observation.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 39 – The role of Śavāsana within the Viniyoga of…

The role of Śavāsana within the Viniyoga of…

Within the application of Cikitsā Krama
Śavāsana is a position for relaxation.
Within the application of Rakṣaṇa Krama
Śavāsana is an Āsana for resting.
Within the application of Śikṣaṇa Krama 
Śavāsana is an Āsana for observation.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Yoga Practice Pointers – 102 – Energetically in terms of Prāṇa and Cakra, we seek to expand and lengthen…

Energetically, in terms of Prāṇa
and Cakra, we seek to expand
and lengthen the upper part of
the body above the diaphragm.
Energetically, in terms of Apāna
and Cakra, we seek to reduce
and shorten the lower part of
the body below the diaphragm.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers – 9 – Better not to confuse what are merely meditational practices…

Better not to confuse what are
merely meditational practices,
with the practice of meditation.
The former may be taught as a
learning step towards the latter.
The latter is something that really
can’t be taught, but can be learnt.

Link to Series: 108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 151 – Yoga is about being more with the experience of seeing…

Yoga is about being more with
the experience of seeing rather
than the experience of the seen.
Bhogā is about being more with
the experience of the seen rather
than the experience of seeing.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

T Krishnamacharya Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
TKV Desikachar Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
Paul’s Sūtra Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali
Paul’s Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters

The Viniyoga of Āsana – Planning an Appropriate Āsana Practice

Planning an Appropriate Āsana Practice

How can we consider factors around the planning of an appropriate Āsana practice?

For example, how would we consider the following situation:

  • Rising at 6.30 am
  • Stiffness in the neck
  • Stiffness in the legs
  • Nostrils blocked
  • Stomach tight
  • Head feeling heavy
  • Work meeting at 8.30 am (20 minutes walking time needed)

We can find out how much time is available, say 30′. So now we can prepare a practice. Though, whatever principles we use there are certain things that need to happen.

However, we should have respect for:

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Yoga is a mystery. It does not mean the same thing to each and every one…

viniyoga

“Yoga is a mystery.
It does not mean the same thing to each and every one.
In spite of the vast field it covers curing
chronic ailments, extra-sensory perception, etc,
hardly anyone is able to define it in simple terms.
Where is then the hope of experiencing its true significance?
What about the risks of inappropriate use of Yoga methods and practices?
Why are so many people all over the world taking the word
and the substance of Yoga so lightly, so ridiculously?
Like everything, Yoga must be presented intelligently.
It should be spoken of carefully and offered according to
the aspiration, requirements and culture of the individual.
This should be done in stages.
Systematic application of Yoga, be it
concerned with physical exercises, deep breathing,
relaxation, meditation, lifestyle, food, studies,
is the need of the day.
This I believe – is what the word Viniyoga represents.”
TKV Desikachar

The Spirit of Viniyoga is starting from where one finds oneself……

viniyoga

“The Spirit of Viniyoga is starting
from where one finds oneself.
As everybody is different and
changes from time to time, there
can be no common starting point,
and ready-made answers are useless.
The present situation must be examined
and the habitually established
status must be re-examined.”
TKV Desikachar

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 30 – Finally, whatever the Practice Aims or Intended Learning Outcomes….

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

9. Finally, whatever the Practice Aims,
or the Intended Learning Outcomes,
try to conserve the Spirit of Viniyoga.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 29 – Thus the relationship between Aims and Intended Learning Outcomes…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

8. Thus the relationship between Aims
and Intended Learning Outcomes
needs to consider the ‘What’ as
being very different from the ‘Who’.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles within Āsana Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma Collected and Collated

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 28 – Allow for any unexpected or unintended learning outcomes.

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

7. Allow for any unexpected or
unintended learning outcomes.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 27 – Consider the accumulative effect of Āsana and Pratikriyāsana…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

6. If being practised regularly, consider
the impact of the accumulative effect
of Āsana and Pratikriyāsana, in any
one practice, and especially over time
on any aims and intended outcomes.
Observations here can be helped by
keeping the practice concise, consistent
and coherent in intention and execution.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 26 – Consider, the Physiological, Energetic and Psychological aspects of practice…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

5. Consider, the Physiological, Energetic
and Psychological aspects of practice.
Perhaps exploring intended learning
outcomes across five areas that practice
can enable us to interact with, namely the
Body, Spine, Breath, Mind and Emotions.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 25 – Furthermore, we must also respect the after-effect of the Āsana practice…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

4. Furthermore, we must also respect
the after-effect of the Āsana practice,
as well as the after-action yet to come.
Here we must respect the travel from A to Z
and that Z seems to vary much more than A.
For example, there are generally fewer
variables with practice in the morning.
Whereas, with practice in the evening we are more
subject to the day’s effects and thus more variables.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 24 – Consequently, it is better to consider distinguishing starting from the immediate…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

3. Consequently, it is better to consider
distinguishing starting from the immediate situation,
rather than with what are long-term aims,
in order to respect where a person is coming from,
in terms of age, situation, gender, work, lifestyle, etc.
As well as including the variable of a person’s
previous training and other factors such as
time of day and the season, both inside and out.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 23 – Appreciate how you can factor short-term outcomes within long-term aims…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

2. Appreciate how you can factor short
term outcomes within long-term aims,
though avoid having too many aims or
intended outcomes within one practice.
Thus, in order to be clear about the goal
and avoid trying to reach too many goals
in the same practice, it is necessary to
consider some practice technicalities in
order to bridge the gap between the
short-term outcomes and long-term aims.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 22 – Be clear about the difference between Aims and Intended Learning Outcomes…

General Guidelines for Setting Practice Aims and Learning Outcomes:

1. Be clear about the difference between
Aims and Intended Learning Outcomes.
Furthermore, distinguish between
short-term and long-term aims
and short-term and long-term
intended learning outcomes.

The Viniyoga of Planning Principles Guidelines – Collected & Collated

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 150 – Still subtler layers of meditative reflection as in Samādhi……

Still subtler layers of meditative reflection
as in Samādhi, can reveal the source of this
confused sense of “I” Am-ness, as in leading us
to the roots from which the tree trunk, and then
the branches grew, namely the ultimate illusion.
These hidden roots sustain this existential illusion
where, what in reality is transient, adulterated,
infused with suffering and non-Spiritual,
is personally lived and experienced as if
everlastingunadulterated, infused
with pleasant feelings and Spiritual.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 149 – Deeper layers of meditative reflection, as in Dhyānam…

Deeper layers of meditative reflection,
as in Dhyānam, can reveal a source for the
symptoms, which we might compare to the
trunk from which these three branches grow.
Revealed is a confused sense of “I” Am-ness
in terms of what we believe to be as if one
inner essence which empowers us to perceive.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes Collected and Collated
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters