Stress or tension, however, has its origin in the attitudes to our actions….

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“Stress or tension, however,
has its origin in the attitudes to our actions.
There are two attitudes in particular that are the cause of stress.
These are:
Aham and Mama.
Aham or Ahaṃkāra is the attitude “I am the doer”
and Mama or Mamakara is the attitude “it is for me”.
These two factors most surely produce Udvega.
The moment the attitude is one of NaMama
– ‘not by me’, ‘not for me’,  there cannot be any stress.
A person who has total faith in God cannot
have stress and will not exhibit the Udvega.”
 Yoga Sūtra on Stress – An interview with TKV Desikachar

Action is best performed when it is for the good of the society…

srimad_bhagavad_gita

Action is best performed when
it is for the good of the society,
with the spirit of dedication to the lord
and with freedom from the attitude of
being the doer and the beneficiary.”
– TKV Desikachar on Gītārtha Saṃgraha of Śrī Yāmunācārya Śloka Seven
(Yāmunācārya commentary on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Three)

View All Gītārtha Saṃgraha Quotes Collected & Collated
View All Bhagavad Gītā Quotes Collected & Collated

108 Gītā Study Pointers – 10 – The Yoga of action…

srimad_bhagavad_gita

The Yoga of action.
Who is acting?
Why am I acting?
Where am I acting from?
What am I acting towards?
– Paul Harvey on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Three

Link to Series 108 Gītā Study Pointers

View All Bhagavad Gītā Quotes Collected & Collated
View All Gītārtha Saṃgraha Quotes Collected & Collated

108 Yoga Sūtra Key Word Pointers – 13 – Śraddhā

The aim of this Series, and its companion page (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Questions), with its Sūtra by Sūtra guided study question within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word-by-word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

108 Yoga Sūtra Key Word Pointers – 13

ŚRADDHĀ

Chapter One verses 20-22

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 19 – In Sūtra 1.19 Patañjali appears to be alluding to two possible cul-de-sac’s…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word-by-word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 19

bhava-pratyayaḥ videha-prakṛti-layānām |

In Sūtra 1.19 Patañjali appears to be alluding to
two possible cul-de-sac’s for misplaced intention,
in terms of experiencing an illusion of freedom.
What are they and how can they be avoided?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 18 – In Sūtra 1.18 Patañjali introduces the notion of Saṃskāra…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word-by-word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 18

virāma-pratyaya-abhyāsa-pūrvaḥ saṃskāra-śeṣaḥ anyaḥ |

In Sūtra 1.18 Patañjali introduces the notion of Saṃskāra.
What is the relationship of Saṃskāra, as introduced
in this Sūtra, to the outcome of Abhyāsa,
as discussed in the preceding Sūtra?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 55 – For example Viparīta Padmāsana could be approached…

We must also consider the safety factors

3. For example Viparīta Padmāsana could
be approached by working dynamically
from Ardha Padma Sarvāṅgāsana
into Ardha Padma Halāsana. This would
ascertain the ability to work into and with
Padmāsana in an inverted Āsana such as Śīrṣāsana.
Thus, any Āsana practice must allow for certain
safety factors, so we are able to work with respect
and regard for the individual involved and yet
retain consideration of and for the safety factors.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 54 – For example we have Śīrṣāsana and Padmāsana…

We must also consider the safety factors

2. For example, we have Śīrṣāsana and Padmāsana.
Because of being able to do these Āsana a
person wants to do Padmāsana in Śīrṣāsana,
exploring an Āsana known as Viparīta Padmāsana.
However one has to know the factors involved.
One cannot assume that because two things
are possible, a third will follow automatically.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 53 – Along with creating a situation for new responses…

We must also consider the safety factors

1. Along with creating a situation for ‘new’ responses to occur,
any guidelines must also consider the safety factor.
This is helped by being able to distinguish characteristics
between say Bhujaṅgāsana and Paścimatānāsana.
Thus an elementary knowledge of what happens
in the body is required, along with consideration
of prerequisites and appropriate Pratikriyāsana.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

The Yoga of Patañjali, presented in very brief pithy statements…

“The Yoga of Patañjali, presented in very brief pithy statements,
asserts that all human problems emanate from the mind
and can be resolved by changing the quality of this mind.
Not only can they be resolved, but a person can also
utilise this refined mind for every use possible,
including comprehending the divine mystery.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras 1996

TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Study Quotes Collected and Collated
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Study Quotes Collected and Collated

Ekāgratā is compared to the sharp tip of the steady flame…

srimad_bhagavad_gita

Ekāgratā is compared to the sharp tip
of the steady flame of a Ghee Lamp
when not exposed to any wind.
In other words,
the mind should not move
anywhere else other than in the
direction fixed for Dhāraṇā.
Obviously the Viṣaya for Dhāraṇā
and Dhyānam should be the same.
The stronger the Dhāraṇā,
the steadier the Dhyānam.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Six verse 19

View All Bhagavad Gītā Quotes Collected & Collated

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 158 – Īśvara Praṇidhānā appears as a Sādhana Upāya at three unique reference points…

Īśvara Praṇidhānā appears as a Sādhana Upāya at
three unique reference points in the Yoga Sūtra.
In the Samādhi Yoga Pāda within Chapter One.
In the Kriya Yoga Pāda within Chapter Two.
In the Aṣṭāṅga Yoga Pāda within Chapter Two.
Three appearances is in itself a call to take note.

A further reflection is that each of these occurrences
can also be linked to the three practice principles
in the Tri Krama of Cikitsā, Rakṣaṇa and Śikṣaṇa.

read more

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 52 – Āsana are not automatic but can become so…

A third factor, that of Respect for Responses

6. Āsana are not automatic but can become so.
The inevitability of voluntary actions is that we
get used to them and they become involuntary.
With this, the risk factor is increased as well.
So what is voluntary and what is involuntary is
completely different when there is a ‘new’ response.

However, such a response needs to be linked to
something deeper than just merely a ‘tweaking’,
or ‘inventive’ variation within the form of the body.

Given, that in Yoga the breath is that which gives life.
By cultivating a role for, and the purpose of the breath,
we are creating and re-creating a situation for, not just new,
but also more subtle responses to occur and reoccur.

Within this field for enhancing awareness,
through our relationship with the breath,
the risk factor is reduced as well.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 51 – We must consider our waking posture…

A third factor, that of Respect for Responses

5. We must consider our waking posture,
which is usually standing or sitting.
Thus, we have a gap from this to
the main Āsana we intend to use.

How can we bridge this gap from everyday
postures to Āsana, in terms of form and function?
Principles of practice are means to bridge the
gaps according to place, time and circumstances.

Here, we can cultivate steps towards being
able to access an Āsana with a conscious
composure, remaining awake within it
and maintaining a respect for responses.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 50 – So Āsana are considered as voluntary phenomena…

A third factor, that of Respect for Responses

4. So Āsana are considered as voluntary phenomena,
like writing with your opposite hand.
Thus, it is an action which requires conscious control.

However, when you are used to going from everyday
postures to Yoga Āsana they become automatic in use.
Thus, they become involuntary.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 49 – Voluntary, as in controlled action and involuntary…

A third factor, that of Respect for Responses

3. Voluntary,
as in controlled action
and involuntary,
as in action or reaction
without conscious control,
have both positive and negative aspects.
For example, a person who has a particular
problem would seemingly come voluntarily.
However, their reaction in response to
what we ask them to do may be involuntary.
So we have to consider a person’s responses.
As in, what are and what are not
acceptable responses when we travel
from everyday postures to Yoga Āsana.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

Where do Āsana lead us?……

Where do Āsana lead us?

“Where do Āsana lead us?
1. For seated practices
To stay in a stable posture with the spine erect,
for Dhyāna or preparation for Dhyāna.
2.  For health
They do something for the energy flow of the body.
3. Ability to master the body
Not necessarily to promote health,
but to show that we can master the body.
Often these are good for health,
though many are only useful as challenges.”
– TKV Desikachar

Further Reading – What is the Yoga of Krishnamacharya?

Fixing the Manas in a particular place…

srimad_bhagavad_gita

Fixing the Manas in a particular place,
disciplining the senses,
seated in a proper posture,
a person begins Yoga for Citta Śuddhi.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Six verse 12

View All Bhagavad Gītā Quotes Collected & Collated

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 51 – When looking at the means to explore the art of improvisation…

When looking at the means to explore the art of
improvisation within the choice and application
of Āsana, we need to be specific in our intention.

For example,
we could look through the lens of two questions:
1. What are the areas that we wish to investigate?
2. What are the ways to explore these in Āsana?

If we are specific in regard to the first question,
as in what is the area or areas to be investigated,
then we can explore these in the second question,
through utilising the art of improvisation in Āsana.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 50 – One aspect to the art of modification in and of Asana…

One aspect to the art of modification in Āsana,
is in order to sustain a specific direction of Candra
according to the primary Lakṣaṇa of and in an Āsana,
amidst a contrary potential to stimulate a dispersion
of Candra, because of the demands of the secondary
Lakṣaṇa overpowering that of the primary Lakṣaṇa.

This also implies that we have personally embedded
a theoretical and experiential understanding, through
study of the process in the Viniyoga of Āsana, according
to their inherent primary and secondary characteristics.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting