108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 42 – In relation to the psychological ideal of remaining there…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

12. Finally, the consideration of movement
or stasis sits within a relationship to the
deeper purpose of Āsana within our journey
through the body and the breath, to the mind
and beyond, through considerations such as:
In relation to the psychological ideal of remaining there.
According to the definition in  Chapter Three verse 2 of
the Yoga Sūtra, a continuity of psychic activity is the ideal.
This is seen as the ability to stay, as if in the same moment, as
one moment melds into the next moment and the next moment.
In other words, the ability to internally maintain a continuity of
experience as if maintaining an apparent stillness of movement.
Access to such subtle states requires a containment of movement
that ultimately extends from the body to the breath to the mind.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 41 – In relation to the concepts of Dhāraṇā and Dhyānam…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

11. Furthermore, the consideration of movement
or stasis sits within a relationship to the
deeper purpose of Āsana within our journey
through the body and the breath, to the mind
and beyond, through considerations such as:
In relation to the concepts of Dhāraṇā and Dhyānam.
Dynamic is the effort to move the activities of the mind,
as well as of the body, in one direction as in Dhāraṇā.
The observations from dynamic work also allow us to see
the role or appropriateness or subtlety of static work.
Here static can be considered as the holding of the mind,
as well as of the body, in one direction as in Dhyānam.
As Dhāraṇā precedes Dhyānam in terms of directing the
activities of the mind, so dynamic work precedes static
work in terms of directing the activities of the body.
So, the quality of the attention within the mind, as well
as the body, is important in helping us to experience the
progressive interrelationship between movement and stasis.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 40 – In relation to the fluctuations of the Guṇa…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

10. Furthermore, the consideration of movement
or stasis sits within a relationship to the
deeper purpose of Āsana within our journey
through the body and the breath, to the mind
and beyond, through considerations such as:
In relation to the fluctuations of the Guṇa.
Ideally, dynamic work is a state of still movement,
rather than a state of active movement, as in Rajas.
Equally, static work is a state of bright stasis,
rather than a state of dull stasis, as in Tamas.
Thus, in relation to the Guṇa, the application
of both movement and stasis in Āsana need to be
appropriately supported by a quality of Sattva.
As in a quality of stillness within dynamic work
and a quality of brightness within static work.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 39 – In relation to the dual concepts of Sthira and Sukham…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

9. Furthermore, the consideration of movement
or stasis sits within a relationship to the
deeper purpose of Āsana within our journey
through the body and the breath, to the mind
and beyond, through considerations such as:
In relation to the dual concepts of Sthira and Sukham.
Dynamic can be too much effort, as in overly Sthira,
and Static can be too relaxing, as in overly Sukham.
Thus, the use of movement and stasis in Āsana needs
to consider how to correlate these two qualities, namely
that of steady attentiveness with that of spacious clarity.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 38 – The consideration of the roles of movement and stasis can be further developed…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

8. Furthermore, the consideration of the roles of
movement and stasis can be further developed through
Krishnamacharya’s teachings on application of Āsana.
For example, whether for circulation or for purification,
within both structural and/or systemic roles for Āsana.
Regarding circulation, or what he called Rakta Calana.
When you want to activate the circulation you move.
Regarding cleansing, or what he called Śarīra Śodhana.
When you want to activate a purificatory process you stay.
Both presume there is competent access to the breath,
working access to the concepts of Prāna, Apāna and Agni,
and experience of how to direct the breath in the spine.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 37 – In looking at the principles of dynamic and static we must consider…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

7. Consequently in looking at the principles
of working with dynamic and static,
we must consider the following:
– The Lakṣaṇa of the chosen Āsana
– The Lakṣaṇa of the practitioner’s body
– The Lakṣaṇa of the practitioner’s breath
– The Lakṣaṇa of the practitioner’s mind
– The Vinyāsa Krama to link the Āsana
with the practitioner’s individual
body, breath and mind.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 36 – Why we choose to move or stay in Āsana…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

6. This would also involve a theoretical study of
the Lakṣaṇa of individual or groups of Āsana.
This is supported by exploring the advantages and
disadvantages of movement or stay in specific Āsana.
All of which to help in appreciating which Āsana
are best used dynamically, or which Āsana are
best used statically and which Āsana can serve the
practice in both a dynamic and a static application.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 35 – The practice from more movement towards more stasis…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

5. Amongst the technical learnings of the different
possibilities for Āsana are topics such as,
the developmental application of Āsana
within the refinement of the practice from
more movement towards more stasis.
This involves an exploration of the immediate
or longer-term potentials for different Āsana:
– When used with long-range movement
– When used with mid-range movement
– When used with short-range movement
– When used with micro movement.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 34 – Linking Dynamic and Static Asana within a Vinyasa Krama

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

4. Linking Dynamic and Static Āsana within a Vinyāsa Krama.
In this respect the application of the principles of
both dynamic and static work, when planning for
Āsana practice, allows for a more efficient use of
the body and respect for the variables such as
time of day, time of year, time of life, preceding
or following activities, the length of practice,
the role of practice, our practice needs, etc.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 33 – Stay is the Static aspect of an Āsana or posture…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

3. Generally, in terms of Āsana practice,
we can consider two types of physical activity,
that of Dynamic or Movement and Stay or Static.
Stay is the Static aspect of an Āsana or posture.
Though some Āsana are more suited to Stay or Static Work.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 32 – Dynamic movement in Āsana is the initial way of…

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

2. Relating these two types of activity,
dynamic movement in Āsana is the initial way
of assessing what is what in the body,
in the breath and in the mind.
Furthermore, you can’t just press a button and
get into and out of an
Āsana, you have to move.
So there is a starting point in learning the practice of
Āsana.

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma
– Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Yoga Planning Pointers – 31 – Dynamic is the movement aspect of an Āsana or posture….

Different Types of Postural Activity in Āsana Practice

1. Generally, in terms of Āsana practice,
we can consider two types of physical activity
that of Dynamic or Movement and Stay or Static:
Dynamic is the movement aspect of an Āsana or posture.
Here some Āsana are more suited to Movement or Dynamic Work

Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma – Collected Viniyoga of Practice Planning Principles
Āsana Mudrā & Prāṇāyāma – Collected Practice Planning and Practice Theory Questions

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 44 – Saying that the direction of Āsana is towards staying…

Saying that the direction of Āsana is
towards staying does not mean that the
direction of all Āsana is towards staying.
In other words the role of some Āsana is
as a secondary support Āsana and their use
is merely as a dynamic preparatory aide to
support a deeper relationship with those Āsana
within which their primary purpose is staying.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 15 – In Sūtra 1.15 Patañjali introduces Vairāgya as dispassion…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word-by-word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 15

dṛṣṭa-anu-śravika-viṣaya-vitṛṣṇasya vaśīkāra-saṃjñā-vairãgyam |

In Sūtra 1.15 Patañjali introduces Vairāgya
as dispassion arising from an absence of thirst.
Towards what and how would you interpret its
relevance towards your outer and inner life?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

 

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 35 – As an adjunct or extension to the Āsana element of a practice…

As an adjunct or extension to the Āsana element of a practice,
Prāṇāyāma can be applied to either enhance, stabilise or reduce
the impact of accumulative effects arising from the Āsana element.
The skill is being able to choose which is appropriate for that day,
in relation to where we are coming from in terms of that day’s Āsana,
and our personal choices as to where we are going to need to be after.

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

108 Yoga Practice Pointers – 105 – In Āsana the breath is a mirror for the body…

In Āsana the breath is
a mirror for the body.
In Prāṇāyāma the breath
is a mirror for the mind.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

Physiological and psychological considerations around the practitioner’s starting point…

How do the teachings from Krishnamacharya and Desikachar apply Yoga to the individual?

Fundamentally, the starting point determines the direction……

In exploring this premise, I would suggest reading a post from 2018 exploring the chronological teaching model outlined in the article ‘What are the concepts of Sṛṣṭi Krama, Sthiti Krama and Anta Krama’. Especially considering that these important principles from Krishnamacharya’s formational teaching, in the later years of his tenure in Mysore and early years of his tenure in Madras, also influenced and set the styles for those of his pupils who went on to influence the teaching of Yoga in the West.

However, if we apply this chronological model within the generic modality inherent within much of group class teaching in the West these past decades, we already have an issue, since most people coming to Yoga are already at some point in their middle years or Sṛṣṭi Krama. This can also mean that despite looking for such as physical fitness or mental challenge, they are not necessarily coming from a Sṛṣṭi or growth stage starting point.

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108 Postural Practice Pointers – 43 – It is not enough in Āsana to just  work at lengthening the breath…

It is not enough in Āsana to just
work at lengthening the breath.
We need also to explore how to
refine the subtlety of the breath.
Whether within a single Āsana,
a number of Āsana in one practice,
or within the evolution of all aspects
of our practice over a number of years.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

.

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Word Pointers – 11 – Vairāgya

The aim of this Series, and its companion page (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Questions), with its Sūtra by Sūtra guided study question within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

In this post, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected textual links, quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word by word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Word Pointers – 11

VAIRĀGYA

Chapter One verses 15-16

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

T Krishnamacharya & TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verses 1-9 Study Quotes Collated

T Krishnamacharya & TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra
Chapter Two verses 1-9 Study Quotes Collated

Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two – Sādhana Pādaḥ

“What about others who are known as Vyutthita Citta,
a mind easily prone to agitations and distractions?
This second chapter known as Sādhana Pādaḥ caters to them.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two is for those who
want to move to the state of Chapter One.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“What we try to do in Yoga is simply to create conditions so
that the mind becomes a most useful instrument for action.
And this can only be done gradually.
Any “short-cut method” is an illusion.
This gradual procedure may involve a number of intelligent means,
all of which come within the realm of Yoga Sādhana.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“The Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali deals with the mind.
It examines the different functions of the mind
and provides means to modify these functions
so that it serves the person in a very constructive way.
The means by which certain qualitative changes in the mind
are brought about is called Sādhanā.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:

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