In observing, we must remember a few more things……

“In observing, we must remember a few more things:

When we are not able to see something,
It is either because something else is more obvious,
or because it is too close to us.
(Sāṃkhya Kārikā of Īśvara Kṛṣṇa Āryā Seven)

We can only observe when there is an inclination to do so.
(Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 17)

Because of our own memories, backgrounds, cultures, etc.
Each person looks at the same problem differently,
which may cause problems.
(Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 15)

We must respect time and change,
although the tendency nowadays is otherwise.
We must wait and observe more than once
so as not to be trapped by the fact
that things appear like this one day
and like that another day.”

– TKV Desikachar 1981

I am going to explain you something else about the aphorisms…….

“I am going to explain you something else about the aphorisms, about their translation.
Many books or courses have been written about the treatise of Patañjali.
Some of them analyse the words one by one, trying to translate them separately,
dissecting the text. This way of proceeding may be interesting,
but unfortunately it can also confuse instead of helping understanding of the text.

Why?
Because literally translating the aphorisms is nothing but a series of words glued together,
in sentences that very often lack in consistency.

The ancient way of exposing was not translating them into a new language;
it was mainly making the student grasp the sense of the aphorism.
In this case, the Sanskrit text is just a reminder,
a mnemonic that the teacher is not going to translate textually.
They are going to use it to develop the idea or the sense of the aphorism.
They will explain these notions, sometimes even without referring to any word of the aphorism.
What is important is to give a teaching that is adapted to the level of understanding of the student.”

– TKV Desikachar on Learning from the Yoga Sūtra
Extract from Viniyoga Europe No 1

We see what we need to see.

“We see what we need to see.”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

The Yoga Sūtra indicate five ways to reach the highest……

samadhi

The Yoga Sūtra in Chapter Four verse One
indicate five ways to reach the highest.
The fifth is the most laboured
because we must start from the bottom.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Patañjali says that the only way to understand yourself……

Patañjali says that the only way to understand yourself
is to understand what is outside of yourself.
He also says that the more you talk about yourself
the less you know about yourself.”
– TKV Desikachar

According to Patañjali even when you have something in front of you……

uparaga

“According to Patañjali,
even when you have something in front of you,
you may not see it.
Even when you don’t have something in front of you,
but you want to see it,
you will see it.
Everything depends on YOU.”
TKV Desikachar Madras 1988

Patañjali says that the problem is fed by internal elements……

TKV_France_1999

“Patañjali says that the problem is fed by internal elements,
by the search for immediate benefits in life,
by external elements and
by the psychic nature of the person.”
– TKV Desikachar

Everything we do has an origin.

vasana

“Everything we do has an origin.”
– TKV Desikachar 1995

But Saṃskāra can be fed by Vāsanā.

vasana

“But Saṃskāra can be fed by Vāsanā.”
– TKV Desikachar January 12th 1995

What factors promote favourable Saṃskāra?

samskara

“What factors promote favourable Saṃskāra?”
– TKV Desikachar January 10th 1995

Saṃskāra is so powerful, it can lead you to act without thinking.

samskara

Saṃskāra is so powerful,
it can lead you to act without thinking.”
– TKV Desikachar 1995

The new is not as strong as the old.

Desikachar_France_1999

“The new is not as strong as the old.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter 4 verse 27

What the mind accomplishes is of little consequence……

“What the mind (Citta) accomplishes is of little consequence;
what is important is that the inner self should experience an accession of power,
that universal energy called Cit,
which is the life source of the individual.”
– ‘Land of a Thousand Buddhas’  Theos Barnard.

What is the greatest obstacle to meditation?

dhyana

“Question: What is the greatest obstacle to meditation?”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

When an object is invisible, it is not invisible because it is not there……

visaya

“When an object is invisible,
it is not invisible because it is not there,
but because something hides it.
What you seek may be next door,
but you won’t find it precisely because it is next door.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

According to Patañjali, comprehension is dependent opon two things……

apeksa

“According to Patañjali (Yoga Sūtra C4 v17), comprehension is dependent upon two things:
1. Your interest
and
2. The proximity of the object.
Apekṣā is the interest of the Puruṣa for the object.
The success of Dhyāna depends on the force (Śakti) of the Puruṣa
that pushes the mind to direct itself towards an object.
Without interest, there is no question and no answer.
If you have the interest, you will discover the proximity.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

How does the ‘I’ influence Dhyāna?

dhyana

Question: How does the ‘I’ influence Dhyāna?
“Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra, which describes every aspect of mental activity,
provides an answer to this question…….”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988