The mind is an accumulation of actions and memories of actions……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House
“The mind is an accumulation of actions and memories of actions.
This conditions us to act as we have been acting.
In doing so, we cannot detect that things are changing and therefore,
our actions might go wrong.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Six Page 85

Yoga is a Saṃskāra in that it equips us to realise our greatest potential……

svastikasana

”Yoga is a Saṃskāra in that it equips us to realise our greatest potential.
If we wish, it can prepare us for and lead us to the beatitude of the divine presence.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

Who is suffering?……

duhkha_5

“Who is suffering?
Who is recognising it?
What can release this suffering?”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 23

Apart from right food other activities like travel to holy places……

tapas devanagari

“Apart from right food other activities like travel to holy places,
giving away gifts to the needy are also part of Tapaḥ.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

The power of Īśvara alone ensures success……

isvara

“With faith in Īśvara, the master of the whole universe,
regularly offering prayers.
Whether it is Tapas, Svādhyāya or Īśvara Praṇidhānā,
the power of Īśvara alone ensures success.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Our journey to our roots is Svādhyāya……

svadhyaya_2

“The study that helps us to know where we are from and what progress we have achieved.
In short, our journey to our roots is Svādhyāya.
There are many means. Vedic chant where the student repeats exactly how the teacher recites the text is one. The means should respect our culture.
It must help explore our own background, our strengths and weaknesses and our progress.
Even a good teacher can be a mirror, a Svādhyāya.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

They are called Kleśa because they cause difficulty……

They are called Kleśa because they cause difficulty

“They are called Kleśa because they cause difficulty.
If not now then some other time.”
– TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3

For Anuṣṭhānāt to become and remain important there needs to be Śraddhā.

sraddha

“For Anuṣṭhānāt to become and remain important there needs to be Śraddhā.”
– TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 28

Aṅgānuṣṭhānāt – Irrespective of failures and testing times you will not leave it.

“Aṅgānuṣṭhānāt – Commitment
Irrespective of failures and testing times you will not leave it.”
– TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 28

The order is important – from gross to subtle, we need one to appreciate the next.

kriyayoga

“The order is important
– from gross to subtle,
we need one to appreciate the next.”
– TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Kriyā Yoga means to have certain qualities in our actions……

kriyayoga

Kriyā Yoga means to have certain qualities in our actions.
e.g. listening to this lecture
Natural for people with a stable mind.
So something has to be done for others.”
– TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two is for those who want to move to the state of Chapter One.

“Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two is for those who want to move to the state of Chapter One.”
– TKV Desikachar

In the Yoga state we experience what is beyond the mind.

drastr

“In the Yoga state we experience what is beyond the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

Through devotion and surrender to Īśvara……

Through devotion and surrender to Īśvara

“Through devotion and surrender to Īśvara
and by following the eight limbs of Aṣṭāṅga Yoga,
the benefits of Samādhi are realised with as little effort
as it takes to hold a pea in the palm of your hand.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 24

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Five Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Five Theory: Duḥkha and the Concept of Saṃskāra – Pages 69-79

read more

We are always experiencing Duḥkha even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.

duhkha_5

“We are always experiencing Duḥkha
even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

The only Duḥkha that matters is that which is about to come.

duhkha_5

“The only Duḥkha that matters is that which is about to come.
Things that have happened or are happening must be accepted.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 74

When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.

“When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

The greatness of Patañjali is to look at Duḥkha as the stepping stone to success.

IWYS_M1

“The greatness of Patañjali is to look at
Duḥkha as the stepping stone to success.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

Mind is not the highest point in Yoga.

citta

Mind is not the highest point in Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 18