108 Yoga Sūtra Study Word Pointers – 11 – Vairāgya

The aim of this Series, and its companion page (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Questions), with its Sūtra by Sūtra guided study question within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

In this post, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected textual links, quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word by word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Word Pointers – 11

VAIRĀGYA

Chapter One verses 15-16

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

2023 Live Group Modular Studies Workshop and Course Diary Dates

Tara Yantra

What are the advantages learning through small group single-topic Modules?

– Modular programmes offer an individualised progressive pathway
– Single topic specialisation for a study intensity and in-depth presentation
– Traditional transmission between teacher & student to optimise absorption
– Small groups limited to five students for individual time within a shared focus
– Exclusive learning environment supporting study and attention to the student
– Relevance to the individual’s situation through dialogue facilitating interaction
– Studying practice and texts with a personal rather than teacher training priority

All the Small Group Modular Workshops and Courses are based in the Cotswolds within  a country setting and retreat atmosphere. They are limited to a maximum of five students in order to facilitate an in-depth focus, in terms of intensity and relevance to group situations, all within an exclusive learning environment. The Module One Workshops are open to all, though a topic needs completing  before progression to Module Two Courses within the same topic.

Overall the Yoga Study Programme offers over 600 contact hours of Workshops and Courses, all with a single topic specialisation within live small group meetings or where preferable, one-to-one online eStudy. Together they offer a deeper understanding of Yoga or Chant Practice Techniques & Theory and Yoga Associated Textual Studies.

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T Krishnamacharya & TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verses 1-9 Study Quotes Collated

T Krishnamacharya & TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra
Chapter Two verses 1-9 Study Quotes Collated

Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapter Two – Sādhana Pādaḥ

“What about others who are known as Vyutthita Citta,
a mind easily prone to agitations and distractions?
This second chapter known as Sādhana Pādaḥ caters to them.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two is for those who
want to move to the state of Chapter One.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“What we try to do in Yoga is simply to create conditions so
that the mind becomes a most useful instrument for action.
And this can only be done gradually.
Any “short-cut method” is an illusion.
This gradual procedure may involve a number of intelligent means,
all of which come within the realm of Yoga Sādhana.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“The Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali deals with the mind.
It examines the different functions of the mind
and provides means to modify these functions
so that it serves the person in a very constructive way.
The means by which certain qualitative changes in the mind
are brought about is called Sādhanā.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:

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108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 14 – In Sūtra 1.14 Patañjali outlines qualities he feels are…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word by word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 14

saḥ tu dīrgha-kāla-nairantarya-satkāra-ādarā-āsevitaḥ dṛḍha-bhūmiḥ |

In Sūtra 1.14 Patañjali outlines qualities he feels are
important in cultivating the intention within Abhyāsa.

What are these qualities and how can we
realise them within our efforts to remain there?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

 

Among the some, a few become Dharma Mitra…

“In the journey of life, one meets many people,
Among the many, some become Karma Mitra.
Among the some, a few become Dharma Mitra.
This day marks the passing of one such friend,
dear Dharma Mitra Ziva Kinrot, I salute your light.”

Remembering dear friends within the passage of life and death…

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 34 – Is the primary obstacle to experiencing Prāṇāyāma…

Is the primary obstacle to
experiencing Prāṇāyāma as a
developmental process, coming
from what arises within the mind,
rather than from within the breath?

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

The breath can be a key towards unlocking the mystery of the relationship between……

In looking at how to deepen (rather than broaden) our personal practice, choosing to focus on exploring the breath can be a key towards unlocking the mystery of the relationship between body, breath, mind and that which is both beyond and within.

“Yoga is more about exploring
the movement of the mind, whilst
Āsana is more about exploring
the movement of the body.
The vehicle common to exploring both
is the movement of the breath.
The yoking of all three is towards the goal of
experiencing the source of all movement.”

Here, from the viewpoint of T Krishnamacharya, an avenue for deepening an exploration into the potential of the breath within our practice can be through a systematic and progressive slowing in the cyclic patterning of our breath. To access this deepening we may have to reconsider our practice, not just in terms of what we do with our body, but also what we do with the breath within the various Yoga practices associated with our body.

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The Viniyoga of Yoga is the application of the principles that…

viniyoga

The Viniyoga of Yoga is the application of the principles that,

linked together, offer possibilities to enhance our relationship with ourselves through our personal practice.

This approach, with its emphasis on one to one transmission, opens the possibility that a deepening of our practice comes not from adding more difficult Āsana, but from further refining our relationship with what Āsana we already have.

Life is already full of pressures to go for the newest and latest, ever improved model. Plus it’s often easier shopping around to bring more in from the outside rather than putting time aside and concentrating on bringing more out from the inside.

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108 Postural Practice Pointers – 42 – The breath is the activating force in all aspects of the Āsana…

The Breath is the activating force in all aspects of the Āsana.
For example, when comparing a dynamic performance
of an Āsana with the static performance of an Āsana,
the difference is in the degree or extent of the movement.
Thus, from a Viniyoga or application of Āsana perspective,
whether the extent of the movement is what is seen
as long-range, mid-range, short-range, or even micro,
the activating force of the Breath is integral to the Āsana.

From a developmental viewpoint, as in a longer-term
Vinyāsa Krama, this a journey from those Āsana that
mainly favour long-range movement, towards those Āsana
and Mudrā that mainly favour micro-range movement.
Within this developmental refinement in the relationship
of Breath as the activating force, sit the place and roles
of mid-range movement and short-range movement.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

Exploring Prāṇāyāma within Cikitsā, Rakṣaṇa and Śikṣaṇa Krama…

1. Prāṇāyāma, the same as with Āsana and Dhyānam, was taught according to…

Prāṇāyāma, the same as with Āsana and Dhyānam, was taught according to the core principles within Cikitsā KramaRakṣaṇa Krama and Śikṣaṇa Krama.
Thus we have breathwork practice possibilities ranging from Cikitsā, using simple ratios to settle an irregular breathing pattern or pulse fluctuation, to Rakṣaṇa, with a visible competence and fluidity within a range of basic techniques and mild ratios, to Śikṣaṇa and a skill base encompassing all techniques, and ratios and especially, the application and integration of Kumbhaka with long holds both after the inhale and the exhale.

2. What defines the transition between Cikitsā, Rakṣaṇa and Śikṣaṇa Krama is the desire…

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108 Postural Practice Pointers – 41 – The Length of the Breath sets the speed of Movement…

The Length of the Breath
sets the Speed for the
Movement of the Body.
Rather than the Movement
of  the Body setting
the Speed for the
Length for the Breath.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 33 – Exploring Prāṇāyāma as Prāṇāyāma within Śikṣaṇa Krama requires a mastery of the inhale…

Exploring Prāṇāyāma as Prāṇāyāma within
Śikṣaṇa Krama requires a mastery of the inhale.
For that using Viloma Ujjāyī is recommended.

It is a short-term technique taught specifically
to develop and refine the inhale as a preparation
for working with long-term bi-channel techniques
such as with Nāḍī Śodhana and Sūrya Bhedana.

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 32 – What can define a transition between Cikitsā Krama, Rakṣaṇa Krama and Śikṣaṇa Krama in terms of Prāṇāyāma?

What can define a transition between
Cikitsā Krama, Rakṣaṇa Krama and
Śikṣaṇa Krama in terms of Prāṇāyāma?

Is it that in Cikitsā Krama, the priority is
establishing an Āsana practice with the aim
of developing a core relationship with Ujjāyī?

Whereas, in Rakṣaṇa Krama, the priority is
establishing a Prāṇāyāma practice with the aim
of developing a core relationship, primarily
with Anuloma and secondarily with Pratiloma?

Whereas, in Śikṣaṇa Krama, the priority is
developing a core relationship, primarily with
Nāḍī Śodhana and secondarily with Sūrya Bhedana?

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

Dreams can be situations which amplify Vāsana.

Dreams can be situations
which amplify Vāsana.”
– TKV Desikachar on the
Māṇḍūkya Upaniṣat verse 4

Upaniṣat Textual Quotes Collated

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 13 – In Sūtra 1.13 Patañjali succinctly defines the aim of Abhyāsa…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word-by-word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 13

tatra sthitau yatnaḥ abhyāsaḥ |

In Sūtra 1.13 Patañjali succinctly
defines the aim of Abhyāsa as
the effort to remain there.
What is the ‘effort‘ mentioned here?
Where is the ‘there‘ mentioned here?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

 

Online Yoga & Associated Textual Studies Downloadable PDF Workbooks…

This is a post to highlight the textual study support resources that are currently available within the Viniyoga of Yoga Practice and Yoga Study PDF Repository Page.

Below you can see listed PDF study workbooks for the Yoga Sūtra, the Sāṃkhya Kārikā, the Bhagavad Gītā, the Gītārtha Saṃgraha and the Māṇḍūkya Upaniṣat.

Heading each of the five textual options is a link to the overview page for each within the Yoga Freenotes aspect of the Yoga Studies Website.

They are not © and are available as a PDF in both A4 and US Letter versions, as open source community commons, in the spirit of Paramparā with an appreciation for my years of personal study in India with TKV Desikachar.

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108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 31 – What can define a transition between Cikitsā Krama, Rakṣaṇa Krama and Śikṣaṇa Krama in terms of the breath?

What can define a transition between
Cikitsā Krama, Rakṣaṇa Krama and
Śikṣaṇa Krama in terms of the breath?

Is it that in Cikitsā Krama, the priority is
within Āsana practice and establishing a
core relationship with using the breath?

Whereas, in Rakṣaṇa Krama, the priority
is within Āsana practice, and developing
the core relationship, primarily with the
exhale and secondarily with the inhale?

Whereas, in Śikṣaṇa Krama, the priority is
within Prāṇāyāma practice, and developing
the core relationship, primarily with the exhale
and the inhale, and secondarily with the holds?

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers – 30 – In order to access its inner dimensions, I feel Prāṇāyāma needs to be sustained…

In order to access its inner dimensions,
I feel Prāṇāyāma needs to be sustained,
in terms of both frequency, consistency and
competence, rather than it being a sporadic,
or perhaps nominal foray, into its potential as
a primary tool within Bāhya Aṅga Sādhana.

Maybe this is because of insufficient interest
in a long-term exploration into Prāṇāyāma?
On this point, one might offer observations
on the environment and expectations within
which the styling of modern group classes
are framed, seemingly ‘posing’ as if ‘Yoga’?

Or, perhaps because this cursory glance at its
form and function arises from us just looking
for nominal, immediate or even external fruits?
As one might with Āsana, when experiencing
a structural, energetic or psychological issue?

Link to Series: 108 Prāṇāyāma Practice Pointers

Glossary of Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting Categories

Glossary of Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques

108 Yoga Study Path Pointers – 35 – Better not to confuse Bodywork with Āsana…


Better not to confuse:
– Bodywork with Āsana.
– Energywork with Mudrā.
– Breathwork with Prāṇāyāma.
– Mindwork with Dhyānam.
– Voicework with Mantra.
– Soulwork with Puruṣa.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Study Path Pointers

108 Yoga Sūtra Study Question Pointers – 12 – In Sūtra 1.12 Patañjali defines Abhyāsa and Vairāgya…

The aim of this series, and its companion series (Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Study Keywords), with its single guided Sūtra word within a parallel flow, is to progress through a themed reflective journey across the four chapters or Pāda that comprise the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali.

On this page, a question will be proffered as a reflection and inquiry into a single verse. Here each verse in the text will be explored successively, via a link to its translation, word by word breakdown and added commentaries collated from the website, to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

On the companion page, a word will be listed as a symbol for a specific verse or set of verses as we progressively traverse each chapter. It will offer an exploration, via a link to the Saṃskṛta Glossary, of all the connected quotations and posts, collated from within the website these past 12 years, again to invite the reader to form their own opinion as to what is implied.

My wish is to offer an insight into the spectrum of Yoga teachings received from T Krishnamacharya mainly via TKV Desikachar, in terms of both breadth and depth.

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ verse 12

abhyāsa-vairāgyābhyāṃ tat-nirodhaḥ |

In Sūtra 1.12 Patañjali defines Abhyāsa
and Vairāgya in relation to Nirodha.

A question we can explore as
an avenue towards grasping this
Sūtra is, what is the relationship
of these two seeming polarities?

Namely, what are the qualities of
Abhyāsa, in relation to the qualities
of its seeming counterpart, Vairāgya?

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters