I do feel that verses ten and eleven in Chapter Two of the Yoga Sūtra……

I do feel that verses ten and eleven in Chapter Two of the Yoga Sūtra offer a directional shift as an inspiration for undertaking the transitional commitment from Kriyā Yoga towards Aṣṭāṅga Yoga.

“These (Kleśa) are subtle and are
overcome by going back to their origin.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 10

“This fluctuation
(the rise and fall in their perpetual potency to ‘take over’)
is overcome by meditation.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 11

For me, these two verses are an essential reflection in the transition from the integration of Bāhya Sādhana, towards the cultivation of Antar Sādhana. Furthermore, when considering this deepening of our Sādhana from Bāhya towards Antar, these verses also re-mind me of the simple yet heartfelt teaching inherent in Chapter One.

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108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 99 – Building banks to channel the flow of the river…

Building banks to channel
the flow of the river of
Kleśa is Kriyā Yoga.
Building a dam to block
the flow of Kleśa as
we journey upstream
going back to the source
of the flow is Aṣṭāṅga Yoga.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 10

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 98 – Kriyā Yoga is more about working with the symptoms…

Kriyā Yoga is more about
working with the symptoms.
Aṣṭāṅga Yoga is more about
working with their cause.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 97 – The Section on the means to help do something for…

The Section on the means
to help do something for
the practitioner starting
with an agitated psyche.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 96 – Satya is about how we use truth…

Satya is about how we use truth
rather than truth in and of itself.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 36

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 95 – The Section on the assimilation of what thinks it perceives

The Section on the assimilation
of what thinks it perceives,
with the source of perception.
– Paul Harvey introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 94 – Now, you follow what follows, the teachings of Yoga.

Now,
you follow what follows,
the teachings of Yoga.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 1

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 93 – At all other times we identify with the fluctuations within the mind.

At all other times we identify with
the fluctuations within the mind.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 92 – From this state, the clarity of being…

From this state,
a clarity of being,
as seeing is from the
source of perception.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 91 – Yoga arises from the containment of…

Yoga arises from
the containment of,
our propensity to fluctuate.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

Paul’s Yoga Mālā – A Thread of Pearls from Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 90 – We can experience an absence of thirst for the ephemeral Guṇa…

We can experience an absence of
thirst for the ephemeral Guṇa
when the recognition of the
eternal Puruṣa pulls us more.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 16

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers – 6 – In Meditation the most difficult exercise…

In Meditation the most
difficult exercise for
the mind, is the one of
not exercising the mind.

Link to Series: 108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 89 – We never ‘give up…’, we can only ‘stop…’

We never ‘give up…’,
we can only ‘stop…’,
because something
else pulls us more.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 15

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Yoga Study Path Pointers – 28 – How to cultivate as intimate a relationship…

How to cultivate as
intimate a relationship
with our Yoga Practice
as with our mind’s habits?

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Study Path Pointers

108 Gītā Study Pointers – 5 – There is always Rāga, it just depends where we are in ourselves

There is always Kleśa, it just depends where we are
in ourselves in terms of a spectrum of being and doing.
Thus Kleśa can express itself within the spectrum of being
as either a state of Rāga Kleśa or a state of Dveṣa Kleśa or,
as happens mostly, somewhere twixt the extremes of the two.
Either way according to TKV Desikachar’s teaching,
progress is not possible without the power of these drives,
they are the horses that pull the chariot.
As to which of the two extremes we find ourselves
veering towards depends on our skill as a charioteer,
coupled with our understanding of the nature of the horses,
as well as the nature of the ‘food’ we ‘choose’ to feed them on.
– Paul Harvey on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Three verse 34

Link to Series 108 Gītā Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 88 – Rāga is more about passion for the outcome…

Rāga is more about passion
for the outcome rather than
passion for the action in itself.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Teaching Path Pointers – 40 – Has the fusion of Yoga and Fitness…

Has the fusion of Yoga and Fitness
become a confusion of Yoga as Fitness?

Link to Series: 108 Teaching Path Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 87 – Saṃskāra always looks to our past experiences…

Saṃskāra always looks
to our past experiences
to determine our choices
for our future actions.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 9

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 86 – An awareness of an absence of awareness…

An awareness of an
absence of awareness
is in itself an awakening
in awareness of awareness.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 20

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

A fundamental facet in the principles of Āsana, Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma practice…

slibss_web

A fundamental facet in the principles of Āsana, Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma practice, in the teachings of Krishnamacharya through Desikachar, is the ordering of Āsana according to the acronym SLIBSS.

It is the practice arrangement or Vinyāsa Krama in the following order:

This is referred to in Religiousness in Yoga page 23-27.

It is the foundational structure on which all the other variants of Āsana, Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma practice arise from or are goals towards.

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108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 85 – Dispersion is a habit…

Dispersion is a habit
that pulls us away from
the habit of containment.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 9

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 30 – The starting point for the Āsana is the breath…

Postural Practice Pointer 30 – The Starting point for the Āsana

The starting point for the Āsana is the breath.
The finishing point for the Āsana is the breath.
The journey between the two is via the breath.

Link to Series: 108 Postural Practice Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 84 – Taking care within the ‘small’ arisings…

Taking care within the ‘small’ arisings
is directly related to our capacity to
take care within the ‘big’ arisings.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 2

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 83 – Better to be creators of our future…

Better to be
creators of our future,
rather than
curators of our past.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

Link to Series: 108 Sutra Study Pointers

What is the nature of the Dṛśya or what can be perceived…

“What is the nature of the Dṛśya or what can be perceived?
It has three qualities; it reveals, it acts, it has substance.

It has many components, the objects known and the means to know them.
They serve two roles.
When in strong association with the perceiver they produce pleasure or pain
when this association is absent they let the perceiver visualise its own nature.

Experience of pleasure or pain is by the perceiver.
Freedom from them is also its fundamental situation.
This freedom is no different from Mukti.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 18