108 Postural Practice Pointers – 70 – Janu Śīrṣāsana, known as the head to knee Āsana…

Janu Śīrṣāsana, known as the head to knee Āsana,
combines the qualities of a seated forward bend with
those of an asymmetrical pose, in that it works first,
on one side of the body more, then on the other side.

In this Āsana, the physical focus is on the lengthening
of the muscles of the back, spine and the extended leg,
and the rotational effects on the joints in the folded leg.

Plus, with its seated forward bend Bhāvana, there is
a natural support favouring the exhalation, offering
opportunities to both lengthen and deepen the breath.

This support, along with its  internalising and closing
qualities, offers possibilities for the student to focus on
the quality of the attention within the form of the body.

Thus, using Janu Śīrṣāsana with its seated forward bend
Bhāvana, and when linked with a mindful breath, can help
the student to experience the deeper function of the Āsana,
even if there are limitations with regard to its Śikṣaṇa form.

108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 190 – There are indications that accompany the distractions…

There are indications that
accompany the distractions.
Such as a sense of uneasiness,
or a melancholic moodiness.
Or, as an agitation in the body
and in the breath, expressed as
unsteadiness in the limbs and
in the exhalation and inhalation.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 189 – These inner obstacles that confuse the psyche are…

“These inner obstacles that
confuse the psyche are:
Physical Sickenss,
Mental Rigidity,
Lack of Trust,
Negligence,
Lethargy,
Dissapation,
False Opinions,
Not Attaining a Foundation,
Not Maintaining What is Attained.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 188 – From that journey inwards towards experiencing…

From that journey inwards
towards experiencing the
transparency of awareness,
something more, an absence
of obstacles as distractions.”
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 29

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 69 – When working with Paścimatāna Āsana, such as Uttānāsana…

When working with Paścimatāna Āsana,
such as Uttānāsana, or Parśva Uttānāsana,
or Paścimatānāsana, or Janu Śīrṣāsana.

Keep the arms held up as you exhale down,
releasing and lowering them lightly at the end.

Lifting the arms first as you inhale up and
leading from the arms until upright again.

Activate the abdomen as you exhale down,
retaining a degree of tone as you complete.
This helps in maintaining the effort to keep the
abdomen activated as you inhale and lift up.

108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers – 11 – Kaivalya

A lesser known facet of the Yoga Texts and Freenotes section of the Website is the Romanised Saṃskṛta Core Glossary and Cross Reference Guide. It started life as word by word linked index for the online Yoga Sūtra verses offering a meaning and a cross Sūtra reference resource when exploring related verses.

However, as more Yoga Related Texts were added to the online Database, it was obvious that the glossary needed to include relevant terms from other textual sources that matched or correlated with those in the Yoga Sūtra. So, the glossary now includes terms from related sources such as the Sāṃkhya Kārikā and the Gītārtha Saṃgraha, along with selected verses from the Bhagavad Gītā, and Haṭha Yoga Texts, such as the Yoga Rahasya.

The core word is shown in Romanised Saṃskṛta  and Devanāgarī script, along with a suggested translation, or alternative options where it holds different meanings within different contexts. These meanings are complemented by cross referencing with Similar, Opposite and Related Concept options around the Core Word.

Also added to these categories are:
– Links to Related Resources & Longer Articles, as well as
– Collated Related Short Posts & Quotes arranged in Textual and Practice listings.

Both offer further insight and are collated from all the posts involving the Core Word in the Yoga Journal and the Yoga Texts and Freenotes sections of the website. Together, these guidelines will hopefully help the reader navigate and utilise the ever increasing resources within the Glossary.

Meanwhile, as a further study and practice guide, a 108 Saṃskṛta Glossary Word Pointers Series is offered as an invitation into the depth and breadth of this online resource. The highlight words offered within this group within the series are shown below.

108 SAṂSKṚTA CORE CONCEPT POINTERS

9 – DUḤKHA
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF
10 – AVIDYĀ
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF
11 – KAIVALYA
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF

View the accumulated 108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers Collected and Collated

108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers – Collated between 2011 and 2024

The role of this post is to offer the Yoga Studies blog quotes accumulated so far within the 108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers series as single resource.

Started in 2011, these are a collation of short posts collected over 13 years, on teaching Yoga in the West within the 21st Century. They range from Yoga Teaching tips and tactics, through to quips and quotes as observations, advice and social commentary.

They can be explored as individual posts, or as a collation, both within which the linked words can also be cross referenced in terms of meaning and related occurrence within the Saṃskṛta Glossary. Or the current collected collation can be downloaded as a PDF:

The accumulated Yoga Teaching Path Pointers can be viewed as Individual Posts
The accumulated Yoga Teaching Path Pointers can be viewed Collected and Collated
The accumulated Yoga Teaching Path Pointers can be viewed or downloaded as a PDF

108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers – 55 – One approach in the Viniyoga of teaching…

One approach in the Viniyoga of
teaching the art of breath work
within group situations is that of,
within working Āsana the Bhāvana is
on cultivating the length of the breath.

Whereas, within seated Āsana the Bhāvana
is on cultivating the subtlety of the breath.

The technique of Ujjāyī can be used within
both situations as in, placing the focus on
length within working Āsana, and placing
the focus on subtlety within seated Āsana.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers

Āsana & Mudrā Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated and Sitting

Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary
and Ancillary Techniques

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 68 – A primary Bhāvana in Tāḍāsana is in raising the arms forward of the body…

 

A primary Bhāvana in Tāḍāsana is in raising
the arms forward of the body watching
that the lumbar spine doesn’t hollow.

We want to keep the lower back steady,
whilst adjusting the arms, by releasing
the elbows sideways, as much as is needed
to ensure that the lower back stays long,
and that we maintain the space between
the top of the shoulders and the ear lobes.

Inhale, raise the arms, turning the palms out,
release the elbows, keeping the lower back long.
Exhale, lowering the arms again in a forwards
movement, straightening the elbows by half way,
whilst actively engaging the abdomen to ensure
we don’t collapse the chest and the upper spine.

108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers – 54 – We don’t need to worry about people using Ujjāyī…

Initially, if teaching breath work in group situations,
we don’t need to worry about people using Ujjāyī
or not. Because, even if you are not using Ujjāyī
and you want the student to learn to make the
exhale longer, they must learn how to initiate the
exhalation by contracting the abdominal muscles.

So, making the exhalation longer is something
you can learn and refine independently of Ujjāyī.
Sometimes, even within the very act of making the
exhalation longer people will naturally shift to Ujjāyī.

If teaching individually, we can start with introducing
the student to the process of activating the exhalation.
However, given the uniqueness of the personal dynamic,
initiation into the art of Ujjāyī can usually be presented
within the first lesson, along with accommodating the
structural and the performance differences between the
characteristics of the exhalation and of the inhalation.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers

Āsana & Mudrā Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated and Sitting

Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary
and Ancillary Techniques

108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers – 53 – In terms of the breath, the exhale is naturally passive…

In terms of the breath, the
exhale is naturally passive,
the inhale is naturally active.

So, one of the initial primary
principles in the Viniyoga of
teaching the art of breath work,
is how to make the exhale active.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Teaching Path Pointers

Āsana & Mudrā Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated and Sitting

Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary
and Ancillary Techniques

108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers – 10 – Avidyā

A lesser known facet of the Yoga Texts and Freenotes section of the Website is the Romanised Saṃskṛta Core Glossary and Cross Reference Guide. It started life as word by word linked index for the online Yoga Sūtra verses offering a meaning and a cross Sūtra reference resource when exploring related verses.

However, as more Yoga Related Texts were added to the online Database, it was obvious that the glossary needed to include relevant terms from other textual sources that matched or correlated with those in the Yoga Sūtra. So, the glossary now includes terms from related sources such as the Sāṃkhya Kārikā and the Gītārtha Saṃgraha, along with selected verses from the Bhagavad Gītā, and Haṭha Yoga Texts, such as the Yoga Rahasya.

The core word is shown in Romanised Saṃskṛta  and Devanāgarī script, along with a suggested translation, or alternative options where it holds different meanings within different contexts. These meanings are complemented by cross referencing with Similar, Opposite and Related Concept options around the Core Word.

Also added to these categories are:
– Links to Related Resources & Longer Articles, as well as
– Collated Related Short Posts & Quotes arranged in Textual and Practice listings.

Both offer further insight and are collated from all the posts involving the Core Word in the Yoga Journal and the Yoga Texts and Freenotes sections of the website. Together, these guidelines will hopefully help the reader navigate and utilise the ever increasing resources within the Glossary.

Meanwhile, as a further study and practice guide, a 108 Saṃskṛta Glossary Word Pointers Series is offered as an invitation into the depth and breadth of this online resource. The highlight words offered within this group within the series are shown below.

108 SAṂSKṚTA CORE CONCEPT POINTERS

9 – DUḤKHA
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF
10 – AVIDYĀ
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF

View the accumulated 108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers Collected and Collated

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 67 – Another key Bhāvana for Samasthiti is on the relationship of the neck…

Another key Bhāvana for Samasthiti is on the
relationship of the neck to the upper spine with
the intention of sensitising the Prāṇa Sthāna.

We start by activating the back of the neck
through the application of  Jālandhara Bandha.

Here the focus is on lengthening the spine
through lifting the back of the neck, rather
than dropping the chin towards the chest.

Engaging Jālandhara Bandha can create more
space between the earlobes and the shoulders,
a focus to be maintained when engaging the next
step with raising the arms, such as in Tāḍāsana.

Engaging Jālandhara Bandha, means the shoulders
lower, the arms extend downwards and effectively
lengthen. This activates the arms, meaning active
hands. Here, extend the fingers, feel the fingernails.

All of which is a support and preparation for
focusing on how to access an active inhalation
initiated and sustained from the Prāṇa Sthāna.

You can practice getting people to explore
access to movement in the upper spine with
and then without Jālandhara Bandha to help
experience its relationship with Prāṇa Sthāna as
the starting focus in the spine for the inhalation.

108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

108 Postural Practice Pointers – 66 – A key Bhāvana for Samasthiti is on the relationship of the feet

A key Bhāvana for Samasthiti is on the
relationship of the feet to the ground with
the intention of sensitising the Apāna Sthāna.

We start by activating the soles of the feet
by applying a focused downward pressure.
This helps activate muscle tone in the legs,
and can effect a drop in the sacral area,
and causing a slight lift in the abdomen,
whilst helping to lengthen the lumbar.
All of which is a support and preparation
for focusing on an active exhalation
initiated from the Apāna Sthāna.

You can practice getting people to as if
turn on and turn off the feet and notice
what can happen. Soggy feet implies
both soggy legs and a soggy abdomen.

108 Postural Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling,
Lying, Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

Within the Yoga Sutra Patañjali offers numerous lists which can reflect nuances or gradings…

Within the four chapters of the Yoga Sutra Patañjali offers numerous lists which can reflect nuances or gradings. Sometimes, they are presented in shades of gross to subtle, as in the four Samāpatti, or at other points subtle to gross, as in the five Kleśa.

At other points,
they can mark transitions from more external perceptive processes to more internal perceptive processes, as in the five Citta Vṛtti. Or, from a more externalised Sādhana to a more internalised Sādhana, as in from Kriyā Yoga to Aṣṭāṅga Yoga, or from Bāhya Aṅga to Antar Aṅga.

For example,
below we can see that in Chapter Two Patañjali chooses to present a list for the five Kleśa,
starting with defining the subtlest and most difficult to access insight into.
From there he progresses onto defining and discussing each, whilst moving from the subtlest of the Kleśa towards the grossest, or most easily perceived of the five.

“Anguish arises from the illusion
feeding the conflation of I-ness and Am-ness,
the consequences of pleasure and suffering,
and underpins the fear of not feeling alive.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3

“Illusion is the field out
of which the others grow,
though they may appear
as if asleep, or arise weakly,
be inconsistent or dominant.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 4

“Avidyā is the illusion of recognising:
the ephemeral as the eternal,
the profane as the profound,
pain as pleasure and
the silhouette as the source.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

“Egoity is when the
power of the Seer
and power of Seeing
are as if one essence.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

“Attachment is expecting pleasure.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

“Aversion is expecting suffering.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

“Survival is self–prevailing
and constantly underpins,
even in the wise person.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

read more

108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 187 – Heyaṃ Duḥkham Anāgatam involves two things…

Heyaṃ Duḥkham Anāgatam involves two things.
One is owning an acknowledgement of what has
past, in  that what I said or did was out of order
and, at that moment, this was not a skilful action.

The second is anticipation of the future, in that I
need to have acquired some skills to help in creating
new Saṃskāra as potential energetic alternatives.

Both support my efforts to overcome arisings of
old Saṃskāra leading me into re-action, rather
than the intention that I have choices in action.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers – 14 – How to get the Buddhi to reflect more of the Atma…

How to enable the Buddhi to,
as if, reflect more of the Atma,
rather than the more usual daily
experience of the Manas, as if,
reflecting more of the Indriya?

Link to Series: 108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers

108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers – 13 – In the Indian tradition some Mantra are known as Mahāvakya…

In the Indian tradition some Mantra
are known as Mahāvakya or great sayings.
They express and re-mind us, in both
a mystical and poetical way, of the
presence of the eternal Awareness
within the everyday flux of existence.

There is one such Mahāvakya, renowned
and beautiful in its profound simplicity as
a heuristic means for revelation, whether
your Sādhana traverses either of two paths.
Either, the Sādhana path of Jñana Dhyānam
or, the Sādhana path of Bhakti Dhyānam.

Namely:

तत् त्वम् असि
Tat Tvam Asi ॥
“That Thou Art”

from the Chāndogya Upaniṣat VI.8.7

Download this post as a PDF

Link to Series: 108 Dhāraṇā Practice Pointers

108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers – 9 – Duḥkha

A lesser known facet of the Yoga Texts and Freenotes section of the Website is the Romanised Saṃskṛta Core Glossary and Cross Reference Guide. It started life as word by word linked index for the online Yoga Sūtra verses offering a meaning and a cross Sūtra reference resource when exploring related verses.

However, as more Yoga Related Texts were added to the online Database, it was obvious that the glossary needed to include relevant terms from other textual sources that matched or correlated with those in the Yoga Sūtra. So, the glossary now includes terms from related sources such as the Sāṃkhya Kārikā and the Gītārtha Saṃgraha, along with selected verses from the Bhagavad Gītā, and Haṭha Yoga Texts, such as the Yoga Rahasya.

The core word is shown in Romanised Saṃskṛta  and Devanāgarī script, along with a suggested translation, or alternative options where it holds different meanings within different contexts. These meanings are complemented by cross referencing with Similar, Opposite and Related Concept options around the Core Word.

Also added to these categories are:
– Links to Related Resources & Longer Articles, as well as
– Collated Related Short Posts & Quotes arranged in Textual and Practice listings.

Both offer further insight and are collated from all the posts involving the Core Word in the Yoga Journal and the Yoga Texts and Freenotes sections of the website. Together, these guidelines will hopefully help the reader navigate and utilise the ever increasing resources within the Glossary.

Meanwhile, as a further study and practice guide, a 108 Saṃskṛta Glossary Word Pointers Series is offered as an invitation into the depth and breadth of this online resource. The highlight words offered within this group within the series are shown below.

108 SAṂSKṚTA CORE CONCEPT POINTERS

9 – DUḤKHA
View Related Glossary Quotes and Posts Links
Download all the Glossary Links as a Collated PDF

View the accumulated 108 Saṃskṛta Core Concept Pointers Collected and Collated

108 Yoga Practice Pointers – 113 – Āsana brings steadiness, improved health and lightness of limb……

For me, still to this day, one of the simplest,
direct and most succinct definitions on the
purpose of Āsana within the processes and
practices of Haṭha Yoga, is the one offered in
Chapter One verse 17 of the Haṭha Pradīpikā.

It is a definition valid for any situation,
discussion or presentation, or as a response
to questions from any background, or level
of interest around why we practice Āsana.

It can also be a springboard to linking
the body’s physiological qualities, such as
the relationship of Agni, to the energetic
qualities of health and lightness of limb.

Or, an investigation of the commentary by
Brahmānanda, as that explores psychological
qualities such as the relationship of the Guṇa,
Rajas, to mental qualities such as steadiness.

Link to Series: 108 Yoga Practice Pointers

Āsana and Mudrā Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Standing, Kneeling, Lying,
Inverted, Backbend, Seated & Sitting

Prāṇāyāma & Bandha Practice Techniques Glossary
– Grouped into Primary, Secondary & Ancillary Techniques