108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 184 – Every action, even thoughts have some effect at some level…

Every action, even thoughts have some effect at some level.
Actions create fruits and leave seeds which eventually come
back to the performer of the action, either directly or indirectly.

These actions can be black, white, mixed, or have no colour.
The black actions can potentially have a negative comeback;
whereas white actions can potentially have a positive comeback.
But most actions are mixed, with a vague or indistinct outcome,
or they will have a distinct outcome, but it is difficult to discern.

Those actions that are seen as having no colour are the result
of actions from the highest dispassion, free of selfmotivation.
Because these actions from a Yogin are free of selfmotivation,
they are free of selfinterest, either black, white or mixed.
– Paul Harvey on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 7

Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Keywords – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Questions – Collected & Collated into Chapters
Paul’s Yoga Sūtra Reflections – Collected & Collated into Chapters
TKV Desikachar Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters
T Krishnamacharya Yoga Sūtra Quotes – Collected & Collated into Chapters

2 thoughts on “108 Sūtra Study Pointers – 184 – Every action, even thoughts have some effect at some level…

  1. How should I be aware of the effects my physical, emotional, or mental actions cause without feeling guilty?

    • “How can we evolve in order to change our relationship with suffering?

      One important factor is replacement. The capacity to replace something within ourselves by something else will affect our relationship with suffering. If we are incapable of this then our relationship with suffering will not evolve.

      For example, if we had a bad relationship with our mother in childhood this may dominate our feelings and thoughts concerning her. Every time we are reminded of this relationship the bad things come to the surface – the way she treated us, what we had to endure and so on. This is the way it happens naturally.

      But we can also consider the positive things that must have come out of the relationship, the most important, for instance – the gift of life by the mother to the child. We cannot change the bad childhood experiences, but, if we can replace one way of looking at it by some new way, there may be a change in our suffering.”

      – TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

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